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Bright Eyes Family Vision Care Becomes Only Tampa Bay Retailer of Enchroma Color Deficiency Eyewear

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Our Bright Eyes Family Vision Care optometric practice and Bright Eyes Kids pediatric optometry practice in Tampa, Florida have become exclusive retailers of an advanced eyewear product for patients with color deficiency. Bright Eyes now offers Enchroma glasses for individuals who have difficulty distinguishing colors correctly.

I am very excited about offering this new option to patients. Frequently Dr. Beth and I are the first doctors to diagnose color deficiency in young patients. We know that patients and parents alike have concerns about how they see colors and, if there is a deficiency, how it will affect their lives. These glasses can prove extremely helpful for individuals suffering from the most common forms of Red-Green color deficiency. When you think about just how important color perception is in our everyday lives, you can see what an enormous difference corrective lenses for color deficiency can make for people who need them.

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I have been following Enchroma for several years and I was excited when the company reached out to us. I should note that Enchroma glasses should not be thought of as “color blind glasses.” Color deficiency does not usually involve a complete inability to see colors. Achromatopsia, which presents the world as a black-and-white image, is very rare. The majority of people with color deficiency have trouble either distinguishing between red and green shades or distinguishing between blue and yellow, with the Red-Green deficiency proving most common among the general population. Color Vision Deficiency affects millions of people across the world, affecting 1 in 12 men (8%) and 1 in 200 women (0.5%). A majority of people with the genetic disorder typically inherit the condition from their mother (X-linked trait).

Enchroma glasses are designed to help improve a person’s ability to distinguish colors while wearing the glasses. The lenses employ a specialized filter technology, the patent to which is currently pending. The filters in the lenses help to boost the differences between red and green as perceived by the eye, allowing for more normal color perception. In talking with other doctors who have used Enchroma glasses with their patients, I have heard many positive stories about patients amazed by experience when trying Enchroma glasses for the first time, watching patients smile and feel awestruck by the colors they discover with the glasses.

We will soon be able to have Enchroma lenses made to suit any corrective vision prescription in most frame options, with no extra delay in the fabrication process. We will let you know when we are ready to accept appointments for Enchroma Lenses. Not every person with color vision deficiency will have the kind of improvement in the video below, so a consultation is a good idea. You can read more and take the online test at: http://enchroma.com/.

-Dr. Nate

PS: Listen to the Enchroma episode of the Bright Eyes Podcast here:

 

Podcast Episode #5: Eclipse Safety

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

In this episode, Dr. Nate talks about importance of eye protection during the total eclipse.

Full Transcript: (Dr. Nate)

  • From partial-eclipse territory in Tampa, Florida it’s the Bright Eyes Podcast. My name is Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford and I’m excited to talk about this important topic. There’s lots of people that are talking about the upcoming eclipse and I think that that’s great because this is a once in a lifetime opportunity for lots of people. I don’t know if you remember the eclipse that occurred in 1979. I do remember getting together with people and watching it. This is the first total collapse to cut across continental path over the United States since 1918 and lots of people are going to be watching the eclipse. There’s only a small band from Oregon to South Carolina where about 12,000,000 people live that they’re gonna be able to see the total eclipse. I have friends that are traveling to that narrow area so that they can see it in person. But the reason why I’m doing this episode of the podcast is not so much for the astronomical interest but because of the potential for harm that can happen if you are not prepared.
  • Now, last episode Dr. Beth and I talked about types of damage that can occur both short term and long term from ultraviolet light. Well when we’re talking about the eclipse, when we’re talking about actually looking at the sun, this is ultraviolet light damage on steroids! Now you’ve been told (probably your entire life) “do not look directly at the sun” and that’s true at all times, but it’s especially true during an eclipse when the most interesting thing going on is the sun and its relationship to the moon and the earth. Why that’s such a big deal is because there is something called “solar retinopathy” or sometimes called “eclipse blindness”. What happens is, if you look directly at the sun, the focused light of the sun can cause permanent damage to the back of the eye. However, the back of the eye does not have any pain sensors so you won’t feel any pain or see any symptoms right away. What will happen is later on, later that day or the next day you might notice that you’re having trouble seeing. Just as a quick example if you ever look at a strobe light briefly or if you look at a light bulb that doesn’t have a lamp shade on it, you see what’s called an after-image. And it’s just a little image that you see for a little while and it’s different colors and it slowly fades away. That is the where these photoreceptors of the back of the eye are over-stimulated. It takes awhile for them to get down to regular levels. This is it completely different phenomenon. This (solar retinopathy) is where there’s actual damage to the back of the eye. And so while it’s very exciting, and I do encourage everybody to check it out, I do want everybody to do that safely. So I have 4 items that were published by the American Optometric Association and I’m going to read them and then comment on them just a little bit.
  • Number 1: use approved solar eclipse viewers. The only safe way to view a partial solar eclipse is through special purpose solar filters such as eclipse glasses or viewers that meet international standards ISO 12312-2 for safe viewing. Sunglasses, smoked glasses, unfiltered telescope or magnifiers, polarized filters are unsafe. If you can’t find eclipse viewers, build a pinhole projector to watch the eclipse.
  • So a couple different things here. First of all, pinhole projectors are pin hole viewers are pretty cool and you can do that anytime you don’t necessarily have to do that during eclipse time. And so I would encourage anybody to check that out and I’ll put a link in the show notes. But mostly people are going to use a solar eclipse viewers and and what I really want to point out about that is 1) do get them. They’re very inexpensive. We’ve got some the for the staff, because it’s happening during our business hours, and you can get the many different places I will put a link (below). But the most important thing is: I’ve read news articles about how there are fake solar viewers and so you should test yours out to make sure that they’re safe. And the easiest way to test them out is put them on and make sure the only thing that you can see through them is essentially the sun. Anything that’s less bright than the sun, like a computer monitor or a flashlight or a light in the house, you should NOT be able to see through it. If you can, then that’s not safe. The other thing is they do sell filters for telescopes and it’s very important that you not use the viewing glasses or the eclipse glasses to look through the telescope because the telescope has concentrated that light so brightly that that’s not anywhere near a sufficient protection.
  • eclipse picNumber 2: Technique of the pros: Before looking at the sun, cover your eyes with the eclipse viewers.. While standing still, glance at the sun and then turn away and remove your filters. Do not remove your filters while looking at the sun.
  • So this accomplishes 2 purposes. First, of all you can’t wear the solar viewing protection full time because you can’t see anything. (And if anybody remembers the peril sensitive sunglasses from Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, it’s kinda like that – in scary situations). So you can’t just wear these all the time. But what you want to do is you want to position yourself so you’re not walking around, put them on look at the eclipse look away, and then take them off. That ensures that you’re protecting your eyes from the sun and you’re protecting your body from walking around.
  • Number 3: Totally awesome. Only within the path of totality can eclipse viewers safely be removed to view the eclipse. Once the sun begins reappearing, however, viewers must be replaced.
  • And so this is true. But I still want to provide a note of caution. The eclipse is only going to be in totality for 2 minutes and 40 seconds (at longest) so during that time if you’re in the path of the total eclipse. You can take off your viewers you can look at the eclipse, however I don’t encourage you to do that for very long because very quickly the sun’s going to reappear in you’re going to be at risk again. So I would only encourage you to do that for a short amount of time and then replace your viewers as the sun becomes exposed.
  • And finally: Visit your doctor of optometry if you should experience any discomfort or vision problems following the eclipse visit your doctor of optometry for a comprehensive exam.
  • Now, of course we recommend that people get exams regularly anyways but this is one of those special situations. I have a few other links that I’m going to put in about the eclipse that I think are interesting: the map and some information about the solar viewers. I hope everybody enjoys it has a great time. I’m very much looking forward to it. I know my kids are. But I’ve mostly want everybody to stay safe. If you have any questions let us know at office@BrightEyesTampa.com. We’ll see you next time!

Links:

 

Thank you for listening. If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, you can email us at office@brighteyestampa.com.

The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/107937702@N04/

Fox 13’s Dr. Jo Comes to Bright Eyes to Cover Vision Therapy for Amblyopia

I usually go to bed around 9:30pm, so I was surprised when Edna, Bright Eyes Family Vision Care’s head Vision Therapist, texted me at 10:15 pm to say “You are on the news! Turn on Fox 13!”

She was right. The 4 minute video on our vision therapy program was shown that night and it was repeated the next morning. It was seen by lots of people, judging by the phone calls and email afterward.

You might remember that this summer an adult patient, Betsy, and I were interviewed by Bay News 9 about virtual reality therapy for strabismus (mis-aligned eyes). Well, this was essentially a companion piece to that interview. This time the Dr. Jo from Fox 13 News and her camera man came to Bright Eyes Kids to do a story about amblyopia (sometimes called “lazy eye”). It featured a delightful young patient of mine, Ben, and his parents.

You can watch the video below and if you’d like to read the print story and see some pictures, you can go here.

I love this video. It makes some important points that modern treatment of amblyopia does not involve wearing an eye patch, but rather new technology to teach the eyes how to work together. Not all patients in vision therapy use contact lenses, but that is common in amblyopia treatment, even for young children.

Not only does it cover the subject of amblyopia well, but you can really see the excitement of Ben and his mom. He really has made incredible progress with vision therapy!

It is very rewarding that the media has been interested in our Vivid Vision Virtual Reality Vision Therapy program. It is a wonderfully fun and high-tech application of the principles we use in vision therapy to help children and adults with problems like amblyopia, strabismus and more.

If you are looking for evaluation or treatment of amblyopia, strabismus, or other visual problem for you or your child, request an appointment or call us at (813)-792-0637.

-Dr. Nate

Bright Eyes Family Vision Care and Bright Eyes Kids

Dr. Nate and Betsy Yaros discuss Vivid Vision on Bay News 9

Several weeks ago we mentioned that Dr. Randy Shuck from Bay News 9 interviewed Betsy Yaros and Dr. Nate about Vivid Vision, the Virtual Reality Vision Therapy.

You can watch the whole segment here:

Here are the topics that are covered in the interview

  • Betsy discussed the nature of her vision problems. She explains that she was born premature with cross-eyed and required surgeries. Over time her vision got worse. When the eyes don’t work together, people cannot see 3D.
  • Dr. Nate explained that in some cases, such as Betsy’s, eye surgery can actually over-correct the problem and make it worse.
  • VRVTBetsy described some of the experience she had due her vision problem: being unable to read due to headaches, walking into walls, problems with depth perception, challenges with driving.
  • Dr. Nate explains how Vivid Vision applies Virtual Reality experiences to the principles used in vision therapy. In everyday life, each eye sees the world slightly differently and the brain puts the two images together to provide depth perception. In Vision Therapy, we carefully control the image that each eye sees. This is even more precisely controlled by the Occulus Rift VR system.
  • Betsy describes how easy and fun it was to use Vivid Vision and her experience seeing 3D for the first time.
  • Dr. Nate describes that frequently children do not recognize that they do not see the world the way others do and therefore they don’t complain. For this reason, optometrists recommend eye and vision exams and six months of age, 3 years of age, and every year while in school. This will test the visual skills they need to be successful in school, including the how the eyes move, focus, and work together. These skills can be developed through vision therapy, which includes Vivid Vision.
  • The age of patients that can use Vivid Vision is 6 to adulthood. In some cases, Vivid Vision can shorten the total length of treatment. It certainly makes it more fun.

You can see Betsy’s artwork and read her blog at her website: http://betsyyaros.com/

You can read more about Vivid Vision Virtual Reality Vision Therapy. If you have questions about whether or not Vivid Vision or Vision Therapy in general is an option for you or your child, call us at 813-792-9637, or use the comment section below.

-Dr. Nate

Tetris therapy for amblyopia? Yes, please.

A new study, about amblyopia, has been published and it is really getting attention. From CBS news to Huffington Post to CNET, everyone is covering it, probably because they get to use the word “Tetris” in the title. Tetris, of course, is the hugely addictive block-stack game that, at least in my memory, was the first hand-held videogame blockbuster.

Amblyopia, known to many people as “lazy eye” is a visual adaptation to conditions that interfere with visual development. On a simple level, it means that even with the best glasses or contact lenses, the eye does not see and function as well as expected. It is not due to disease or injury, but rather a situation where the brain doesn’t communicate well with one eye and can’t use the eyes as a team.
Think of the brain being someone on the internet, and one eye is a friend with 14.4K dial up and the other has a 4G smart phone. Yes, you can communicate with both eyes, but you are going to prefer the 4G because it is faster and can do more things. Trying to use both eyes simultaneously as a team is hard because one is lagging behind and missing information.

I am extremely glad to see this study and I do have some thoughts on it:
First, do not get too excited about the Tetris part. While I really have no doubt that Tetris and similar games stimulate visual planning and cognitive development, I suspect that the main benefit of using Tetris in this study is that it is very engaging, requires attention to visual detail, and requires the player to make decisions based on visual information. Basically this is true for most video games (and real world games, for that matter). So Tetris is not the magic here.

What IS a big deal about this study is the goggles – they required the eyes to work together to play the game. If you play, you can’t just shut off the amblyopic eye, or you’ll lose because you won’t see the falling blocks. And that isn’t motivating or good therapy. It isn’t patching or covering the good eye because you won’t see the blocks on the bottom. You still won’t win. This is like conventional patching. You can stimulate the amblyopic eye (upgrading the modem), but that alone only helps somewhat.

What this study shows is that only when both eyes can see and are given the opportunity to work together to achieve a common visual goal is there significant improvement in the amblyopic eye. In my internet analogy, this is not only giving the amblyopic eye a 4G smartphone but making sure it is net savvy. Both eyes are now friends on Facebook and Twitter so they can work together in real time to solve visual-spatial problems efficiently. (Just to be clear: the eyes do not use Facebook, and they do not communicate directly – all that happens in the brain).

So why is this so exciting? Because this is exactly what we do in vision therapy every day. We “upgrade” the eyes to work well individually (4G) but also “network” them to work together (Facebook, Twitter). We don’t use Tetris, but we do use paper & pens, balls, special glasses, computer programs, 3D art, optical illusions and lots of other fun tools to make it fun and productive.

It is great to see more research on this on adults with amblyopia. For too many years, patients have been told that after early childhood there is no hope of improving the vision in the amblyopic eye. It simply is not true. I did a blog post awhile back on the science behind amblyopia. You can see that here. For a great look at binocular treatment of amblyopia, see this recent post on the VisionHelp blog.

Dr. Nate

By Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care

Want to Turn Your Brown Eyes Blue? You Can, But Is It Safe?

We have been so busy with the office move and several Bright Eyes events, that I haven’t written about clinical eye care recently. It is a shame because I have so many things I want to post: new products that are out, educational posts that feature images from my new anterior segment camera, and more. But this is one topic that I found fascinating and have wanted to share for a while now.

For many people, the grass is always greener in other people’s eyes. Well, that’s not exactly right, but there are a lot of people who think they’d like to have a different eye color – be it blue, green, brown, or even purple. For years, the only way to do this was with cosmetic contact lenses. These are like regular contact lenses with paint or dye on them. We fit these on occasion but, but they haven’t improved in technology recently.

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Image from the BBC

Well, now there may be a procedure to permanently change your eye color. A doctor is experimenting with using a laser to remove the brown color from the outside of the iris, the colored part of your eye. This leaves the person with blue eye. I originally read this from the BBC News:

The process involves a computerised scanning system that takes a picture of the iris and works out which areas to treat. The laser is then fired, using a proprietary pattern, hitting one spot of the iris at a time.

So now you are thinking, “I want blue eyes from lasers!” But is this a good idea? I doubt it. Not only are their potential side effects with lasers in the eyes in general in not handle correctly, but also having lots of loose pigment floating around inside your eyes can give you certain types of problems, including glaucoma.

From the article:

“The pigment is there for a reason. If the pigment is lost you can get problems such as glare or double vision,” said Larry Benjamin, a consultant eye surgeon at Stoke Mandeville Hospital, in the UK.
So I don’t think it is a very good idea. But people will take lots of risks if they think it makes them look good. At least ask your regular eye doctor first.

Dr. Nate

Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
Located in the Westchase area of Tampa.
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Dr. Nate’s TV News Segment About Children’s Vision and VSP’s EyePledge program

It is not everyday that a television news crew comes to Bright Eyes, so when we were given the opportunity we were very excited. We got to the office extra early and made sure everything was ready. The subject was children’s vision and the importance of annual eye exams for kids. Children can have a variety of vision problems that interfere with learning, including difficulty seeing clearly, problems focusing and moving their eyes, and difficulty making sense of what they see. For some children, glasses are sufficient to solve their visual problem. For others, Vision Therapy, a series of therapeutic activities, is necessary to ensure the eyes are working properly.

The video also goes into detail about the excellent program called the Eye Pledge that for every Eye Pledge taken, VSP Vision Care will donate an eye exam and a new pair of glasses to a child served by the Boys and Girls Club – up to 50,ooo children. The Eye Pledge is easy to take and doesn’t cost you a thing! Take the Eye Pledge now and help a child. One of the great things about it is that you can specify if you want the donation to go to a child from a Boys and Girls Club in your area or to an area with the greatest need.

To read more and take the Eye Pledge visit: http://www.seemuchmore.com/take-the-pledge

Has your child had an eye exam? They should be a standard part of the Back to School Checklist! If you have questions about children’s vision or children’s eye care, do not hesitate to call us at 813-792-0637.

Dr. Nate

Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
Located in the Westchase area of Tampa.

AOA School Readiness Summit: Focus on Vision

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The American Optometric Association recently held a School Readiness Summit: Focus on Vision in which doctors, nurses, educators and advocates for children’s health gathered to examine learning-related vision issues that are keeping children from achieving in the classroom. This summit was created to address the concerns that our current system is flawed and a policy shift is needed. The problem is that currently, the U.S. educational system and some health care providers rely heavily on vision screenings to discover the kids that need comprehensive exams. These screenings do catch some types of vision problems but they can miss about 75% of those children that have learning-related vision problems. Detecting these vision problems is very important as “studies show that much of what children learn comes though vision, and undetected and untreated eye and vision disorders in children, such as amblyopia and strabismus, can result in vision loss, additional costly treatments, delayed reading and poorer outcomes in school.”

The take-home statement that the summit produced is that comprehensive eye exams must serve as the foundation to determine school readiness in school-aged children. Another important point established at this meeting is the establishment of the link between healthy vision and classroom learning.

This historic summit is an important step in ensuring that children receive the proper detection and treatment of vision problems before they become detrimental to their learning. Here at Bright Eyes Family Vision Care, we are excited to see these changes being made, since it has been our goal from the beginning to not only catch vision problems at an early stage, evidenced by the InfantSEE program that we offer that provides free eye exams to infants between the age of 6 months and 1 year of age, but to also treat certain types of problems through our extensive one-on-one vision therapy program.

If you have any questions regarding the InfantSEE program, vision therapy program, or would like to schedule a comprehensive eye exam for your child before they start school, give our office a call or come in to schedule.

All the best,

Justin Schoonover, CPO

Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
Located in the Westchase area of Tampa.
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Happy Orthokeratology Patients at Bright Eyes

Orthokeratology goes by many names…. Ortho-k, corneal refractive therapy, Gentle Vision Shaping, corneal molding, and others. At Bright Eyes Family Vision Care, we tend to call it corneal reshaping or Orthokeratology. But regardless of whatever terms we choose to call it, our patients call it “awesome!”

Watch for yourself:

(Click here to watch on Youtube).

This last weekend I was fortunate enough to attend and speak at the Orthokeratology Academy of America (OAA) educational conference. The OAA is an international organization of orthokeratologists who provide a nonsurgical alternative to refractive surgery for nearsightedness, astigmatism and hyperopia. Current research also shows that Ortho-K can slow myopic progression in children.

The international faculty of presenters covered topics including myopia control (including soft lens technology), corneal reshaping research, safety of corneal reshaping, progressive/hyperopic Ortho-K lens designs, new corneal reshaping techniques. I heard speakers from Australia, Japan, China, Italy, Spain, and from all over the US.

President Dr. Cary Herzberg had the pleasure of announcing the inception of the new International Academy of Orthokeratology(IAO). The IAO brings together ortho-K organizations from the America (OAA) as well and Europe and Asia. This international organization will support, promote and advance corneal reshaping worldwide thru quality education and research presentations at meetings held around the world. For more information about the OAA click here.

At Bright Eyes, we have successfully treated patients from 7 to 59 years old with orthokeratology. This includes pilots, lawyers, retirees, and lots of kids like Christopher (above). If you would like more information about Orthokeratology, call our office in Westchase at 813-792-0637 or visit http://BrightEyesOrthoK.com

Dr. Nate

Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
Located in the Westchase area of Tampa.

An Optometrist’s Review of the Nintendo 3DS

For months, I’ve been reading, writing, and speaking about the Nintendo 3DS, all without actually seeing or using it. I was finally able to change that yesterday. After helping put the kids to bed, I slipped off to Best Buy and purchased a shiny black 3DS. I brought it home and Cristina and I spent a few hours setting it up and using it. We’ve had a Nintendo DS at Bright Eyes for years that we use as a reward activity during vision therapy, so it was immediately very familiar.

3D Effects

One of the biggest selling points of the 3DS is that the user does not need to wear special glasses to see the 3D effects. This is called autostereoscopic 3D and is definitely where 3D technology is going. It works surprisingly well, considering the small screen. You do have hold the screen flat relative to your head. If you angle the screen, you will either see double or lose the 3D effect. The 3D does work from positions other than dead-center. This means that, while not ideal, it is possible for more than one person to see the 3D effect at one time.

I was particularly interested to see how well the “3D volume” slider worked. This allows users to adjust the amount of 3D shown to suit their tastes and the particular game. It works amazingly, seamlessly well. I was able to adjust the 3D anywhere from none, to just-noticeable, to full with just a flick of my thumb.

Augmented reality3dsar2

One of the most intriguing aspects of the 3DS is its use of AR (augmented reality) as part of the game. This allows the viewer to play the game within the room or area that they are really in. (See picture to the right). Not only is this extremely fun, there are some potential visual benefits to this. If the game is getting further away, it is more likely that the user will hold the game further away and look further away, potentially reducing some strain on the eyes. (I should note that I don’t have any research on this, but it occurred to me while playing.)

3DS vs. DS

One of the biggest visual concerns with 2D game systems such as the original Nintendo DS is that children tend to hold the screens incredibly close – as close as 3 or 4 inches. A person of any age should not hold a book or game closer than their Harmon Distance (or the distance from the knuckle to the elbow). With the 3DS, the 3D effect is better when the game is held a foot or so away from the eyes, so this will naturally encourage users to stay within their Harmon distance.

Safety

Much has been made, appropriately, of the potential adverse effects of using 3D technology, due to the differences of 3DS and real-life 3D. Nintendo’s official warning of “vision damage” occurring for those six and under has gotten a lot of attention. While I haven’t seen any proof of this, I think it is reasonable because a person has to pretty visual sophisticated to use the 3DS. So I do recommend keeping it away from the young kids. They should be building with blocks and playing outside anyway,

3dsjustinFor the older kids and adults (like Justin, on the left) who use the 3DS, eyestrain is possible. Already, I’ve talked to patients who have experienced headaches, nausea, and blurred vision from the 3DS. I’m happy to report that after an hour neither Cristina nor I experienced any of these symptoms. However, we routinely do activities during vision therapy that require visual skill and flexibility. For that reason we are much more accustomed to the visual demands required by the 3DS.

The #1 thing to remember: moderation. Take frequent breaks, even if you feel OK. Use the 20/20/20 Rule – Every 20 minutes, look away from the screen at something 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds. Even Nintendo recommends that players take a 10 minute break every hour.

If you or your children do experience symptoms, or don’t see the 3D even with the 3D on “full” be sure to get a through eye exam to look for vision or eye coordination problems. And remember that eye exams are recommended at age six months, three years, and before kindergarten.

For more on potential health effects of the Nintendo 3DS, see my interview with PCWorld. See also the American Optometric Association’s press release on the subject

Overall

In summary, the Nintendo 3DS easy to use and fun. The 3D effects are effective and being glasses-free is very nice. The augmented reality really works well. When used in moderation for the appropriate ages, I do not see any harm. If you do have concerns, schedule an appointment at Bright Eyes either on our webpage or calling 813-792-0637.

Dr. Nate

Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
Located in the Westchase area of Tampa.
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