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Podcast Episode #15: Myopia Management With Esther Rodas

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

In this episode, Dr. Nate talks with Optician Esther Rodas about Myopia and the treatment options to control it.

You can listen in the player below or read the transcript. The show is available via Stitcher, Google Play, iTunes, and the webplayer below. You can find all previous episodes here. If you have any questions or suggestions for future episodes, please email office@BrightEyesTampa.com.

Previous relevant episodes:


Full Transcript:

Introduction [00:00:10] Welcome to the Bright Eyes podcast. Advice for healthy vision for all ages. Your hosts are doctor Nate Bonilla-Warford and Dr. Beth Knighton. Residency trained optometrist providing eye care to all ages with exams for glasses and contacts and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, Ortho-kertology and sports vision training. Their mission is to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional and individualized eyecare.

Dr. Nate [00:00:38] From rainy Tampa Bay. It’s the Bright Eyes podcast.This is episode number 15. I’m Dr. Nate Bonilla-Waford and today’s episode is all about myopia control. I’d like to introduce our special guest today this is Esther Rodas. Esther is an Optician. She works here at Bright Eyes and not only is she an optician, she’s our myopia control coordinator so Hi Esther.

Esther [00:01:05] Hello everyone. So Esther here just like Dr. Nate just mentioned and been here for about a couple of years and usually I will be the one that you talk to if you have any questions on myopia control and scheduling and all of that good stuff.

Dr. Nate [00:01:21] Absolutely. And when Esther joined us she was a student at the Hillsborough Community College in the opticianry program. And now that she’s got her license she works with us full time and we are so lucky to have her and patients just love her and all the staff does too.

Esther [00:01:37] Happy to be here.

Dr. Nate [00:01:38] Excellent. So Esther we introduced myopia in episode six as part of our refractive error episode. And here’s our vision therapist Miriam giving the definition of myopia.

Miriam [00:01:56] Myopia, aka nearsightedness is a condition where objects up close appear clearly while objects far away appear blurry. With myopia, light comes to focus in front of the retina instead of on the retina.

Dr. Nate [00:02:10] So myopia is all about nearsightedness. It’s all about not being able to see very far away without either contacts or glasses or lenses of some sort or for adults they can consider refractive surgery like LASIK. From your perspective Esther when a doctor diagnoses a child with myopia what are some of the most common questions that parents will ask you?

Esther [00:02:36] Definitely first thing they ask is if it’s permanent. If it’ll get better the older that they get?

Dr. Nate [00:02:43] Right. And that’s one of the questions that they ask us doctors are very first thing. They’re like, are they going to outgrow this? Are these glasses that they need? Or is this something that after a while they won’t need anymore? And one of the things about myopia that’s important to understand is while we see it as vision getting blurrier or glasses getting thicker or stronger, what’s really happening in myopia is the eye ball itself is stretching, it’s getting longer and getting bigger and it’s much easier for the eye tissue to stretch and elongate rather than it is to shrink and get smaller. And so for that reason when we’re talking about myopia I like to say it’s a one way street but it doesn’t really get better. And so after they kind of digest that what are the next questions that parents will ask you?

Esther [00:03:40] So once they know what can potentially happen and the inside of the eye they definitely know the options at that point what they can do to limit that progression.

Dr. Nate [00:03:51] Right. And so when I talked to parents, we always talk about myopia as a condition that needs to be managed. It’s not just in one point in time it’s a lifetime of change that we need to think about. We always talk about myopia in the short term and in the long term. So in the short term, kids need to be able to see, they need to be able to see the board at school, they need to be able to see for sports they need to be able to function in everyday life. There’s a variety of different ways that we can help them be able to see clearly and that’s the common things that people are familiar with glasses, contacts, the night time treatment contacts of ortho-K can help people see clearly. So there’s different options and we need to address that first because it’s very important that we make sure that kids have useful vision for living their lives. But, we also need to make sure that we are addressing the long term component. Because myopia tends to worsen and sometimes more dramatically in some patients rather than others- we need to make sure we’re addressing that and offering different kinds of treatments to hopefully reduce the risk of progression. So in our office Esther, what are the three main ways that we use to reduce the progression of myopia?

Esther [00:05:26] We offer here the Atropine medicated eyedrops as one solution. We offer Ortho-keratology which is the night time lenses and we also offer specialty designs soft multi-focal lenses to help with that progression.

Dr. Nate [00:05:46] Right. And we feel very strongly not just with myopia but with all of our patient care that every option needs to be tailored individually to the patient. So it’s not one size fits all. It’s not that every single patient who comes in needs any one particular treatment but it depends on their lifestyle,it depends on their goals,it depends on their genetics,it depends on if they’re more likely to progress. So very briefly we’ll just go over what these options are. The first one which is the most easy to administer are the Atropine eye drops. Now, atropine is a medication that dilate the pupils and it reduces the eyes ability to focus. And for that reason, it hasn’t been widely used in the United States. It’s used for many many conditions but not for myopia control. Until recently when it was discovered that you could use a very low concentration to minimize the side effects. So we have many patients who are on the low concentration atropine treatment to reduce the likelihood of progression. We don’t know exactly how the atropine works, what it’s doing in the eyes but it’s been shown in many many many studies to be effective. So that’s that’s one option. The other option like Esther said was the multifocal contacts.The multi-focal contacts are worn in the daytime just like any other soft contact that you’d be familiar with. But it has a special optical treatment which provides some stimulus to the eye that reduces its need or its inclination to to get worse. We can optically change how the light focus is on the back of the eye to reduce that stimulus to progress and get worse. And so that’s the daytime contacts. The nighttime contacts the Ortho-K does the same thing optically, but it actually reshapes the eyes so that you can see clearly without daytime contacts or glasses. So you get a little bit of a two for one with ortho-K which is great. So once we do the exam and we take lifestyle into account, we look at all of the the treatment options and I will recommend a particular treatment option for a patient. I’ll bring them out and then they will go over the details and the logistics of that treatment option with Esther at that point. What kind of questions do you get?

Esther [00:08:24] So definitely the top question which you kind of touched on right now is their parents are only super interested and intrigued of like the science behind each one and the how is it that the atropine, the multi focal and that the nighttime lends aid in hopefully limiting that progression of the nearsightedness for their child. So anything you can add to what you just said.

Dr. Nate [00:08:48] So the interesting thing about myopia control is even though there are many many scientific papers exploring how well these different options work and how they relate to each other- we don’t thoroughly understand exactly how they work. We have a pretty good idea of how the optical effects of the multi focal contacts on the ortho-K works to reduce that stimulus to progress. We really don’t know as much about how the atropine works. We know that atropine has been used for hundreds and hundreds of years and it’s been used for many many conditions and it’s extremely safe to use. We don’t know what’s exactly going on at the molecular level to help keep the eyes from progressing, but we do know it’s very effective. I know the parents don’t think that that’s a super satisfying answer but it is the honest answer at this point. So what other questions do parents ask you?

Esther [00:09:45] Definitely risks. They want to know what kind of risks are involved and short term risks and long term risk as well. So for example the night time contacts as they are more rigid than the soft lenses. And they always want to know what the risks are for abrasions and things like that. Almost the same for soft contact lenses for short term risks. Long time parents want to know if the ridgid of lenses will affect the kids eligibility to do maybe LASIK in the future. Parents also ask about any effects that that may have on things such as glaucoma and any long term risks in the medicated eye drops. So it’s kind of like a few questions and one.

Dr. Nate [00:10:34] Well I think that that’s really important topic because with any procedure or with any therapy we always need to weigh the benefits and the risks and that’s part of the discussion that always happens between me and the parents when we’re talking about undertaking one of these treatments. Fortunately in the big picture all of these have been proven to be very safe. And that’s why we can feel comfortable doing them. And that’s why I feel comfortable with both of my children using these different methods. My son uses the medicated eyedrops. And my daughter does the night time Ortho-K lenses. Obviously, if I didn’t feel they were very safe I’d be reluctant to use them with my own kids and I know that lots of doctors around the country and around the world have their own children and in myopia control programs similar to these as well. So let’s talk about the different risks with any contacts. There are certainly risks especially if you don’t use proper hygiene, if you don’t care for them properly. If you use them in a way that you shouldn’t be then you increase those risks. Fortunately all of the scientific studies that have shown that with the Ortho-k lenses for night time don’t have any additional risk compared to traditional contact lens wear. And so that that helps us educate patients properly now. The very first question that people ask me is often, well I was told that I shouldn’t sleep in my contacts because it’s not healthy. So why is it healthy to sleep in these contacts. That’s a great question because it’s true that you shouldn’t sleep in your daytime contacts because one- they’re often not intended for that two- if you’re sleeping in them in the nighttime and then wearing them in the daytime then you’re wearing them for a full 24 or multiple cycles. And that can create problems because the lenses never get cleaned with Ortho-k. One, they are super breathable materials. Two, they’re designed specifically to be worn at night and three they’re only worn for about eight hours at night and then they’re being cleaned and stored the rest of the time. Furthermore the Ortho-k lenses rarely or never leave the house. It’s not like the contact lenses that you wear where you get pollen in them you, get dust in them. If you are out and about your eyes can get sweaty you can get sunblock on them if they goes in your eyes etc. Whereas Ortho-k you put them in before you go to bed you take them out in the morning and they’re clean and so the lenses stay very, very clean and we’re very, very clear about the proper method for keeping the lenses clean. Once we have the proper care method established then the risks go way,way down. It is possible in the short term, if the patient doesn’t have good insertion technique for putting the lenses in to lightly scratch or abrade their eye but that’s very, very rare and when it does happen it’s mild and it resolves right away. Now fortunately, we’ve never had any infection for any of our patients and that is incredibly rare with proper care. That’s the same for our for our soft contact lens patients soft contact lenses are healthier than ever before and the risk of infection is is very, very low. I will add here and I always tell patients all the time, that you should never use tap water or you should never clean your lenses with anything other than solutions that have been provided. You shouldn’t shower or swim or go on lakes or hot tubs with your contact lenses on because that can introduce contaminants or bacteria or amoebas that can cause a severe infection. So I was always educating about that.

Dr. Nate [00:14:48] Regarding the atropine, there are known side effects like I mentioned about sensitivity to light and focusing, but by using the lower concentration those are dramatically reduced. Other than that, the only real side effect that can happen with patients sometimes is if the drops come with a certain preservative and the patients are sensitive to that preservative it can cause an allergic like reaction where the eyes get red and irritated. Many of our patients use non preserved drops and that’s not an issue we haven’t found that to be a common problem. But it’s theoretically possible and some patients you it’s hard to know whether they’re they respond to preservatives or not. In the long term, for long term use- atropine has been used for for many years without any problems or side effects.

Esther [00:15:49] We do go through a couple of compounding pharmacies.

Dr. Nate [00:15:53] Yeah, we do have some options and that’s actually an important point. So if you get the high concentration atropine which we don’t use very often except in the very most stubbornly progressive cases, you can get that at almost any pharmacy because that’s the standard formulation that is used to treat eye disease. The lower concentration is only available through compounding pharmacies and we have a variety of options that we can we can help patients acquire that.

Esther [00:16:25] Have you got at all questions about if it’ll affect someone’s eligibility for LASIK in their future or the glaucoma?

Dr. Nate [00:16:33] Yeah and that’s actually a very common question and it’s a great question because sometimes patients are concerned well maybe this reshaping with Ortho-k reshaping of the cornea will adversely affect them for their chances for Lasik and I say you know exactly the opposite. The goal of Ortho-k is to keep the eyes the prescription is stable enough over the long term so that they remain eligible for for LASIK or refractive surgery. What typically happens is people will do Ortho-k starting when they’re when they’re younger maybe you know 10 or 12 years old and they’ll keep doing it until they’re an adult they might stop at 18 or I had a patient just the other day was 12 and she’s now 30 and she’s been doing it continuously. But if she or other patients wanted to stop as an adult they could wait until their eyes go back to their natural shape and once that’s stable and it’s confirmed to be stable with repeated curvature measurements then they are eligible for LASIK just like any other patient will be.

Esther [00:17:44] How about the glaucoma question?

Dr. Nate [00:17:47] So the glaucoma question is interesting because people worry about glaucoma for this reason- they think the Ortho-k lenses press on the eye to reshape the lenses. And if they’re pressing on the eye then that’s going to increase the pressure inside the eye and if you increase the pressure inside the eye that’s going to increase the risk of optic nerve damage called glaucoma. Now the reason why it is not a risk for glaucoma is because Ortho-k lenses don’t actually work by pressing on the eye what they do is they they are kind of a rigid surface that goes over the cornea and then over time the cornea conforms to that lens it- actually kind of expands outwards to meet the shape of the lens so instead of pressing on the eye, the cornea actually reshapes itself or expands to meet the lens. So there’s no reason to think that the pressure inside the eyes increases when we do Ortho-k and therefore there’s no added risk for it for glaucoma. Again kind of like LASIK, nearsightedness itself is a risk factor for glaucoma if you have very high myopia in nearsightedness you have increased risk for for glaucoma. So it may be that doing Ortho-k might actually help reduce the risk long term of glaucoma.

Esther [00:19:25] That’s great information. Thank you. I would say those are the top questions and the last question that I always get at the very end is if these methods are FDA approved?

Dr. Nate [00:19:38] Right. And so here’s the thing about FDA approval all of these methods are FDA approved for a variety of conditions and treatments but not specifically for reducing the progression of myopia. So we’re very clear when we talk to parents and we have it in writing and we explain that while all of these treatments are scientifically valid and there is many studies that talk about the the benefits that the FDA itself has not gotten around to evaluating yet and stating that these methods are specifically approved for the reduction in the progression of nearsightedness. Many other countries have, and there’s lots of scientific evidence to show that it is, but no the FDA hasn’t. Now, all of these things like the atropine eyedrops are approved for treating many, many kinds of conditions including Amblyopia,which is something that we see in the office a lot. A multi-focal contacts are certainly approved for lots of conditions. Specifically, presbyopia for older adults who need to see up close. Ortho-k, the nighttime contacts is approved for treatment of nearsightedness so that people can see clearly throughout the day, but they haven’t gone that extra step yet in approving it specifically for the reduction in the risk of progression. So that’s something that we think it’s important that people understand it doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t do it, but it is in the state of approval right now.

Dr. Nate [00:21:29] Well, hopefully this has been helpful for people who are interested in learning more about myopia control in the future we hope to have some more episodes detailing how each of these methods work. I think it would be kind of fun to have my kids on and they can talk about their experience. That would be that would be interesting to hear it from their own mouth. And we have lots of other topics in mind if you have any suggestions I have topics that you’d like to hear in the future, please let us know. I’d like to thank Esther for joining us and talking to us today. And is there anything else you wanna say before we go now?

Esther [00:22:16] Thanks for having me and to all those listening to this podcast. If there’s any questions if you want to schedule a myopia consultation with Dr. Nate just ask for myself Esther and be more than happy to answer any questions that I can and get you on our schedule right.

Dr. Nate [00:22:34] And if you want to you can call us at 1-813-792-0637. Or you can e-mail the office at office@BrightEyesTampa.com. Until next time,stay dry.

Outro: [00:22:46] Brought to you by Bright Eyes family vision care and Bright Eyes Kids. Find previous episodes and more detailed information at BrightEyesTampa.com. Creative Commons copyright attribution noncommercial use. The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. There’s no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute a medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis treatment.

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Podcast Episode #14: Adam Cegielski From Eyecarrot on Binovi

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

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In this episode, Dr. Nate talks with Adam Cegielski From Eyecarrot about Binovi and Binovi Touch.

You can listen in the player below or read the transcript. The show is available via Stitcher, Google Play, iTunes, and the webplayer below. You can find all previous episodes here. If you have any questions or suggestions for future episodes, please email office@BrightEyesTampa.com.


Full Transcript:

Intro: 00:10 Welcome to the Bright Eyes Podcast, advice for healthy vision for all ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nathan Bonilla-Warford and Dr Beth Knighton, residency trained optometrist providing eye care to all ages with exams or glasses and contacts and specialty services including vision therapy, Myopia control, orthokeratology and sports vision training. Their mission is to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional and individualized eye care

Dr. Nate: 00:39 From St. Petersburg beach in Florida. This is the bright eyes podcast. My name is Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford and I am here with Adam Cegielski. Adam is the CEO of a company called Eye Carrot and I’m so excited about this because I’ve wanted to do this for almost a year. I’ve been talking and emailing with Adam for a very long time. I’m a big believer in what he does and what his company does and I’ve wanted to get him on this podcast for a long time and it just finally happened that we are in the same room and we can, we can get it done. So how are you doing today, Adam?

Adam: 01:13 Oh, I’m doing great. Dr Nate. Thanks for having me.

Dr.nate: 01:16 Yeah, so this is, so this is really good. So we are here at the college of optometrists and Vision Development, Florida study group. This is an annual meeting that, happens in the summer and the doctors that provide vision therapy and are specialized in children’s vision a get together and we all take turns lecturing and sharing thoughts and cases and , you know, it, it’s, it’s a great meeting. Now you were able to come last year or when the meeting was in Miami you, had an opportunity to interact with some of the doctors and so it’s nice that you’re here and I think that you’re enjoying it because you are from Canada. Yeah. You know, coming down to Florida is not all bad.

Adam: 02:01 No, it’s absolutely great. It’s my second time here. I’ve actually been to Florida three times now because of the COVD annual meeting we had in Jacksonville and it’s not exactly cold right now in Toronto. We are escaping a bit of a heatwave.

Dr. Nate: 02:15 So our office, bright eyes kids was one of the first offices in the United States to have Binovi, which is the product that you guys make and I found out about it before you even really launched and I was very interested in the benefits that this could have for our patients, who do vision therapy. So why don’t you just very briefly introduce our listeners to what the Binovi system is and the different parts of it. And then we’ll go on from there.

Adam: 02:43 Oh, okay. Thanks. Dr. Nate. so really this whole started with my personal experience with vision therapy and my son’s rehabilitation back in Toronto and we had a great doctor help us achieve the goals of vision therapy and got through 40 weeks of therapy. But we had that experience of binders and papers and notes and as a, as a technology futurist or whatever we call ourselves. I and my partner Sam said, listen there’s, a better way to deliver therapy. We think and doing that, we, we sort of unveiled the idea that this should be delivered smoothly through a mobile app with videos with content and we built the Binovi platform, not really a product we built software and hardware that delivers a modern comprehensive experience that, that really maximizes what you get out of in-office therapy and gives you the tools you need at home to be able to do really good homebased therapy.

logo binovi finalAdam: 03:42 So, so the Binovi platform is really a mobile platform that allows the doctor and the therapy teams to deliver home based activities through one to two minute videos that really explain, you know, the way to do these activities which are complex, which are difficult. And that platform was launched and you were one of the first people to even talk to us before we even went live, and so we’ve now launched that software. We’ve launched some hardware and we’re at a spot where I can come back to this meeting and have the confidence of, of, you know, customers that are actually enjoying the product and using it.

Dr. Nate: 04:20 So, you know, I was very interested in what you guys are doing because like you said, vision therapy is very, very powerful, but it’s difficult if you’ve got these binders, these sheets of paper with instructions and you know, in, in our experience. And I think that this is pretty true for, for a lot of offices. The person who’s providing the home therapy is not always the person who brings the patient. There might be a grandma who’s bringing them because mom and dad are work

Dr. Nate: 04:51 Or we’ll live in split households. There’s different things going on. And so communication with the people who are assisting the patient at home, has always been been a challenge and it’s something that we’ve always tried to improve upon by, giving them a manual at home with instructions and those have links to YouTube videos and we’ve tried to make sure that everybody understands the process. But when I saw what you guys were doing, I said, Aha, this is this is a modern way to do this. And that’s why I was, I was on board,

Dr. Nate: 05:28 So what have other doctors told you about their experience with taking it live.

Adam: 05:36 Well, you made a really good point about sending materials home youtube links and you’re not the first person to have this idea. You know, we’ve had many, many doctors across the United States say they had the exact same idea, but obviously the development work to put this all together is, is extensive and took a lot of time and effort and money. Um, but doctors have, you know, have been waiting for some sort of a platform like this to come live. Obviously there’s a lot of different doctors in the United States, a lot of different ways to do therapy. and we’ve, we’ve obviously embraced as much and as many of the ideas as we can from, from all the different people using our software. But for the most part we’ve had really good experiences.

Binovi Touch in action.

Adam: 06:15 You’ve had some doctors that have said, listen, I haven’t done home therapy and years just because of the difficulties you’re explaining right now. And, uh, we live in a different world than we did five, 10 years ago. We have Netflix, we have these video delivery platforms, um, that are such a big part of our lives. And, uh, and really we’re, we’re now at a spot where, the cost of hosting video and the cost of doing these things is at a spot where it is suddenly scaleable. It is realistic. And you know, there are 2.7 billion people with smartphones, I think in the world at this point, maybe closer to 3 billion people. So naturally, video and compression of, of content and compression of data put us into a spot where we can do this. And doctors are absolutely loving the platform. Therapists are loving the platform. And most importantly, when we have a short term window where the, where the APP is not functioning, we realized its value when we have all these patients contacting us saying, I can’t live without this. I need this. Where is the APP? So we’ve had all sorts of really good feedback. And, you know, we’re, we’re in a really good spot right now

Dr. Nate: 07:24 So at our office we see vision therapy, you know, essentially as, as teaching learning and just like my son takes a cello lessons, he has to have both the instruction from an expert, but he also just needs time to practice. That’s that skill and he needs to know what to practice and, and so Binovi does a fantastic job of keeping the patients and the parents up to date on what they’re supposed to be doing. And there’s a checklist that patients and parents know what, what to do. There is a chat feature. So if parents or providers at home, there’s a chat feature, so whoever’s helping the patient at home can interact with the therapist right away and give them some information, that is really helpful. And um, what we like is we can actually see when patients are doing the therapy because patients who practice things get better at them in, you know, in my experience. And so that’s been really helpful.

Adam: 08:29 Yeah. And I’ll give you an example in Canada and a cold winter, we’re doing therapy. Uh, my wife goes to therapy with the doctor and, and my son, they come home, we eat dinner. Therapy’s, usually the last thing on our list to do and of course the binders in the car and it’s snowing outside and you get the binder, no I’ll get the binder and it becomes a a bit of a chore. And ultimately, you know, compliance is a big factor in how healthcare technology is really changing our, our medical landscape and knowing that we’re actually doing this homework, knowing that we’re actually logging into the APP as a clinician. I think it’s very powerful.

Dr. Nate: 09:07 So why don’t you tell us a little bit about what you’re doing right now and where, Eye Care and Binovi are headed in the future.

Adam: 09:14 Okay. So as of right now, the binovi platform has been out for about a year. We have doctors in basically four continents around the world that are using the software. And we’ve completed our first video library. We’re extending the content now to add more educational content through some of our doctors. We have developed a tool that’s been around since I think 1974 called the Wayne Saccadic fixator and we’ve released, I think the seventh version of that now as the Binovi touch. So that is a device that is used in the vision therapy clinics with doctors that actually gives you that, uh, in office Rehab, in that office training. That device is now launched to about 100 clinics across the United States, Canada. And, um, and, and we’ve, really we spent two years working in developing this tool. We’ve probably done about 25 different prototypes. We’ve got an early feedback.

Adam: 10:11 We’ve tried to keep it as true to its original version that was loved and used across thousands of locations around the world. Most importantly now it gives the doctors in the therapy teams simplicity of using the IPAD. It gives the children and the patients using this fantastic experience where they can actually engage with modern tools, too complete therapy and obviously most importantly capture patient data profile data. That ties back to these, to these patients so you can measure progress, not just what you’re doing at home, but in the clinic. Now we’re starting to capture that in clinic data, tie it to the patient experience and obviously share with the parents. You know, that progress has happened week after week.

Dr. Nate: 10:55 And that data that you’re collecting from the Binovi touch, which is modeled after one of the most beloved vision therapy instruments of all time. tell us a little bit about some of the other population, some of the other people you’re working with. This is some pretty exciting stuff.

Adam: 11:11 Yeah. You know, this device has been used with professional athletes across the world. Recently we’ve worked with, an individual named Bryce Salvatore who was captain of the New Jersey Devils. He’s using it in, in his New Jersey training facilities with, with kids and trying to promote the importance of what could be done for vision performance. We have championship mma fighters and boxers and soccer players and football players that absolutely love the device and, Rehab hospitals that are using it on stroke patients and a wide range of utilities essentially.

Dr. Nate: 11:49 So, we’re gonna wrap up here because our meeting’s about to start. But anyhow any last few words you want to mention to our listeners,

Adam: 11:56 Just listen. Just go and do that homework. Log into your APP. Hopefully Binovi is giving you a really good experience that multiplies the benefits of what you’re getting from the doctors and therapy teams you’re working with.

Dr. Nate: 12:08 All right, well thank you Adam. we’ve been wanting to do this for for a very long time. We’ve been together at meetings but just didn’t have our schedules line up so I’m thrilled that we were able to do this to everybody who’s listening. Thanks so much. If you ever have questions, you can reach us at office at BrightEyesTampa.com. And, I hope you have a good time and stay dry. Avoid the rain!

Outro: 12:32 Brought to you by Bright Eyes Family Vision Care and Bright Eyes Kids. Find previous episodes and more detailed information at BrightEyesTampa.com Creative Commons, copyright attribution, non-commercial use. The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis country.

 

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Podcast Episode #8: Vision Therapy with Edna Moore

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

In this episode, Dr. Nate talks with Bright Eyes Family Vision Care vision therapist, Edna Moore about what vision therapy is and what it is like to be a vision therapist.

** See the related episode about how vision and performance – #3 VISION LEADS.

The Full transcript:

Intro 00:00 Welcome to the bright eyes podcast, advice for healthy vision for all ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla- Warford and Dr Beth Knighton, residency trained optometrist providing eye care to all ages with exams for glasses and contacts and specialty services including vision therapy, Myopia control orthokeratology and sports vision training. Their mission is to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized care.

Dr. Nate: 00:41 From the endless summer of Tampa, Florida this is the bright eyes podcast. My name is Dr Nate and I have our first special guest on the podcast. This is episode number eight and I am joined by Ed More. How are you doing, Edna?

Edna: 01:00 I’m doing great. How are you?

Dr. Nate: 01:02 I am super fantastic as always. So, Edna is our lead vision therapist at bright eyes. How, how many years have you been with us?

Edna: 01:02 Over eight years Dr. Nate.

Dr. Nate: 01:19 That is what I thought it seems like forever.

Edna: 01:25 No, it just seems like yesterday, actually it’s gone by a lot faster than what you would think eight years is.

Dr. Nate: 01:30 It’s been wonderful. It has been, and so for those who are not familiar with what vision therapy is, vision therapy really is a program of therapeutic activities that’s designed to improve some aspect of visual skill and that could be somebody who’s a child who either gets headaches or is having difficulty because their eyes don’t move or focus or it could be somebody who’s had some trauma or a brain injury or concussion and they are having double vision and that’s difficult for them. So it could be any of those types of things. Edna sees all different types of patients. And can you describe a little bit about what a day in the life of a vision therapist is?

Edna: 02:27 Sure. Actually, it’s a fun day. Each patient is different and when they come in, they are ready to get started. My job is to not only make it fun but also make it productive. So, we have a list of activities that the doctor has prescribed for the patient specifically during that forty to forty five minute session. And it’s my job to make it fun so that their eyes and their brain can learn quickly. Without thinking that these activities are going to be boring or that it’s hard to do, it’s fun to be able to create ways to show the patient that it can be done. A lot of these patients come in and they’ve already been frustrated with some of the things that they’ve had to do, whether it’s reading or not being able to see clearly, things like that to, being able to go through these different activities and then be able to do at the end. So a day in the life of the therapist is always changing. It’s challenging, but it’s also rewarding and it’s fun.

Dr. Nate: 03:42 Now you had some experience with vision therapy, before you came to work her as a vision therapist, can you tell us a little bit about that?

Edna: 03:47 Yes, my second child, he was ten and at school was hit with a soccer ball, by accident and he fell on the ground and hit his head and for, a number of months, his visual system, I didn’t know what was going on, but his, um, he started experiencing double vision, headaches, vomiting, and I had to, get him from school almost every day we didn’t realize what was going on. He didn’t have a concussion, he didn’t have whiplash, but, he kept telling me that, mom, I’m having double vision on and off, I’m having trouble balancing, I’m having trouble walking, I’m dizzy all the time, so through a battery of tests and getting MRIs, things like that, really all the different conventional ways of testing for these particular symptoms came up negative.

Edna: 04:42 It was only through a remark from a dean at USF had just mentioned in passing that maybe we should try seeing a vision therapist, a doctor who specialized in vision therapy. And that particular doctor had found out that just by doing a number of simple tests with his eyes that he had his center, was shifted to the right. So if you asked him to walk in the center of the hallway, he was actually a walking on the right side of the hallway. So through vision therapy, he went three times a week, about one hour a day and, , he also wore prisms in his glasses. Um, and for about three months we did that. And, after three months I was happy to see that I had my child back. He no longer experience double vision. His headaches were gone. He was no longer dizzy when he walked.

Edna: 05:45 It was as if this was a miracle cure or, but, I had no idea what this was. I did not know what they did with him in that room, but I know that experience as a mother when your child is going through headaches every day and it changes his life it changes the parents life too and and to see a child needlessly suffer like that and not be able to help him, I was relieved and elated that these symptoms had all disappeared and was resolved through vision therapy. So that was my, experience with vision therapy.

Dr. Nate: 06:23 I always love to hear that story because I had my own experience with vision therapy, which I’ll share on a different podcast, but I know that it helps you to be a better therapist when you understand what the patient and the parents are are going through. What do you think patients and parents think of the vision therapy program

Edna: 06:49 After they’re done with vision therapy, I’ve had both patients and parents make comments like “if it wasn’t for vision therapy, he wouldn’t be as confident as he is now”. “He’s doing activities that, before vision therapy, he would not have chosen to even try. Now my child is trying. I’ve had,, patients who hated reading, did not enjoy reading and didn’t understand why her other friends loved reading books where she found it very hard and not enjoyable. And after vision therapy, she’s now reading 400 page books and her mother says she’s just devouring the books left and right because she’s found that reading is now effortlessly.

Dr. Nate: 07:39 Some people, when they think about therapy, they think about physical therapy which might have happened after a surgery or some sort of injury and they don’t always have positive associations with that kind of therapy. What do you say to a parent or a patient who might feel like this is gonna be like that?

Edna: 08:00 I think that, if parents are unsure about vision therapy, it may mean that they don’t quite understand what’s going to take place and so, um, to explain it to a patient or a parent it’s like a sports or taking lessons for music. You come into the office or you go see your coach or you’re going to go to practice and you learn new skills and then you’re gonna go home and you practice, those skills so that you can improve upon them and then you come back the next week and, show your instructor or to learn new skills to build upon that. And that’s what vision therapy is. So as not some type of program where you wouldn’t understand the concepts. So I try to compare it to things that they already know about , if a child is in sports, you know, the child understands that, yeah, they go every week to practice, to learn new skills and then they, it’s to them to go home and practice. And the parents understand that to whether they’ve a learn to play an instrument or play sports. They understand and recognize the importance of that. And so that’s what vision therapy is. It’s as simple as that.

Dr. Nate: 08:00 Think most patients think it’s fun at least some of the time?

Edna: 09:13 Yes. I have heard often whether it’s my coworkers outside the office, outside the vision therapy room rather with the door closed, they can still hear us laughing. They don’t know what’s going on. They hear is clapping. They hear us saying that’s a great job. I hear children, laughing, you know, they mainly comment. They wonder why what’s going on in that room. Sounds like there’s a party going on. So, , a lot of times it is, we do have a lot of fun and sometimes we think some of these things are silly, but uh, there’s a lot of learning and um, a lot of improvement going on. , in these four walls.

Dr. Nate: 09:51 Does that mean they don’t have to put in any effort or work?

Edna: 09:55 No, I’m on the contrary. It just means that their focus is not so much on how hard it is, but the more fun they have, it just makes everything easier for them.

Dr. Nate: 10:07 Want me to put you on the spot?

Edna: 10:07 Sure. Why not?

Dr. Nate: 10:11 Of all the different types of patients that we see, what do you think is your favorite kind?

Edna: 10:17 That’s hard to say. I think the most memorable ones are the adults who have gone through a lot in their life and then all of a sudden something happens and then they are unable to function. They cannot drive, they cannot walk, they cannot ride a bicycle. Something happens and a life stops, for them until they come see us. And then through vision therapy and through practicing on their own, which these are highly motivated adults, their progress is so much quicker and I get to see from where they were, their tragedy or their traumatic experience changed your life, to now seeing them successfully be able to do the things that they enjoy that they couldn’t before they came to see us. So I think that’s, to me is the most rewarding.

Dr. Nate: 11:14 Anything else you want to tell people about vision, therapy, things you’ve learned over the last eight years?

Edna: 11:20 No. Two patients are alike and it’s , again, very rewarding to see that, especially me being here for this long now that I, enjoy seeing past patients who have completed vision therapy and has seen now, where they are in life. When I have seen patients who are six, seven, and eight, and now six years later they’re getting ready to drive or they’re getting ready to, you know, embark on different experiences. It’s just really cool to see sort of these little, what I call a “little, you know, chickens coming back to the hen house”, and showing off what they can do now. And their parents are beaming with pride in saying if it wasn’t for vision therapy, they are, they wouldn’t be. You know who they are today.

Dr. Nate: 12:12 All right, well thank you Edna for being our very first guests. You did a wonderful job. Several episodes of the brightest podcast are all going to be about vision therapy and I’m really looking forward to those episodes so everyone, stay tuned. You can always contact us at office@brighteyestampa.com. See you next time.

Outro: 12:35 Brought to you by bright eyes, family vision care, and bright eyes kids. Find previous episodes and more detailed information at http://Brighteyestampa.com, creative Commons, copyright attribution, non-commercial use. The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Podcast Episode #4: UV Protection for the Eyes

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

In this episode, Dr. Beth and Dr. Nate go outside to discuss ultraviolet light and the importance of UV protection for the eyes.


Transcript:

Dr. Beth: From Bay Bridge Park in Tampa Bay Florida and this is The Bright Eyes podcast. This is episode number 4. I am Dr. Beth Knighton.

Dr. Nate: And I am Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford.

Dr. Beth: And today’s episode is all about sunlight and UV protection.

Dr. Nate: That is right in so we are at one of our favorite parks near the Bright Eyes Family office as you might be able to tell by the children in the background. DO you come here with your family, Beth?

Dr. Beth: Yeah, all the time. My 2 year old loves this place.

Dr. Nate: The only thing I know about this part is that there’s lots of PokeStops here.

Dr. Beth: It’s great to get out to the park with our family is so there’s lots of benefits of being outside – most of all being active. But it’s also great being with our families, whether it’s biking or camping or whatnot. But the thing that we want to stress today is the importance of UV protection while we are outside. When we’re outside were getting bombarded with all this UV light from the sun and for the same reasons we wear sunscreen on our skin to protect our skin we should be also protecting our eyes

Dr. Nate: So we have a lot of patients that moved here from different parts of the country or even different parts of the world and not everybody knows this. But Florida is the Sunshine State. There’s a lot of sunshine in Florida and while that’s lovely and most people do move here specifically for that reason we also do you have to protect ourselves. One of the first things that you can choose to do is trying not to go outside during the absolute highest amount of UV times that that’s usually from about 10 A. M. to maybe 2 or 3 in the afternoon.

Dr. Beth: It always amuses me when the meteorologists talks about the UV index rather weak because here in Florida it’s basically a 9 everyday the whole summer and our summer is really March to September so it’s always a 9 here … so we are constantly thinking about the UV protection that we need … but not so much unnecessarily. From other parts of the U. S. When we talk about sunglasses it’s important that we’re not only looking at how dark the changes as far as the comfort of how our eyes feel outside but that it actually has UV protection in the lens. You want to look for sunglasses that have UV A and UV B protection and the lenses that helps protect you from the most harmful parts of the sunlight.

Dr. Nate: And not only do you want sunglasses that have both right section but ideally you want sunglasses like the ones that we have on right now that have a little curvature to them so they limit light coming in from the sides that it not only protects your eyes eyeball itself but also the eyelids and so that they should look good they should feel good but most importantly they should provide lots of coverage. And you can supplement that with a hat or a visor to protect from the directs sun overhead as much as possible. So Beth is the sunlight a short term, a long term issue, or can it be both?

podcast

Dr. Nate and Dr. Beth protecting their eyes from UV light

Dr. Beth: Absolutely both so there are short term effects on the eyes so say you’re going out on the boat with their family and you’re gonna go water skiing so you’re not wearing your sunglasses you can actually get the equivalent of a sunburn on the front surface of your eye from all the exposure to the light … throughout the day so that’s a short term kind of consequence of the sunlight but then also we have the long term buildup of all this UV damage over time which is exactly why all of our dermatologists in primary care doctors tell us to wear sunscreen and make up with sunscreen and lotions with sunscreen on a daily basis to protect our skin and certainly sunglasses help to prevent those same kind of skin cancers from the eyelids and the surface are round eyes. But also we want to protect the inside parts of our eyes from that long term build up of UV damage the things that that long term UV damage can cause include cataracts or macular degeneration which both can have a impact on how well you can see we want you to be able to see along into your nineties and perhaps beyond and so wearing sunglasses even as a child or young adult really is setting the groundwork for keeping that vision healthy throughout your life.

Dr. Nate: And if you wanted one more reason to protect your eyes from ultraviolet light, it might not cause pain or it might not because I disease but Dr. Knighton and I every day when we look under the microscope people’s eyes we can see the sun damage that occurs on the white parts of people’s eyes called the sclera. People often ask us where can I do to get rid of that and the best answer is to prevent that change from happening in the first place and the way you do that is to protect your eyes with sunglasses, with hats, with using caution when you’re outside when it’s very, very bright.

Dr. Beth: Another really cool advancement and I care is that a lot of the contact lenses also include some UV protection being built right into the contact lens and so that’s been really fantastic that companies have been integrating into the contacts in order to promote healthy vision.

Dr. Beth: One thing that I get asked a lot is what’s the difference between UV protection on my sunglasses and polarization and my sunglasses. The UV protection is that healthy part. That’s the part that blocks out the harms full rays of light to keep your eyes healthy. The polarization is a filter in the sunglasses that helps. to sharpen the vision to kind of give you that HD vision but polarization on its own does not protect you from the harmful light rays so ideally you have sunglasses that have both. But certainly the UV protection is the important part.

Dr. Nate: That is right and that is what we tell patients all day everyday.

Dr. Beth: Well, thank you for listening if you have any questions comments or suggestions you can email us at office@brighteyestampa.com. Until next time…..

Links:

Thank you for listening. If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, you can email us at office@brighteyestampa.com.

The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Podcast Episode #3 – Vision Leads

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

“When vision is working well it guides and leads; when it does not, it interferes.”

—John Streff, OD, DOS, FCOVD, FAAO

Transcript:

  • [00:00:00] From hot hot hot Tampa, Florida this is the Bright Eyes podcast. This is episode number three which is all about Vision Leads. My name is Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford. I am not joined by my usual guest Dr. Beth Knighton. So before we get to the main topic of the show today I want to mention one quick thing. I’m recording in the same exam room which is the blue exam room at Bright Eyes Family Vision Care. But you might notice that the sound quality is just a little bit different. First of all, it’s just me. And second of all, I have a different type of microphone, constantly trying to improve the sound of the show. And so if you have any feedback, positive, negative, or otherwise, just send it to office@BrightEyesTampa.com.
  • [00:00:49] On to the main topic of the show, which is Vision Leads. When I was a student when I was a resident in Optometry, I got to learn from many wise and experienced influential Optometrists and I was lucky enough to see one of them, Dr. John Streff, lecture twice in my career. Dr. Streff was such a warm and generous person who was fascinated by patients and he genuinely wanted to help patients improve their overall quality of life. This topic I think really gets to one of the things that we mentioned briefly in the last episode when we were talking about the differences between Optometrists and Ophthalmologists, and that is how do we think about vision and how do we think about how it affects people’s everyday lives. Dr. Streff is remembered for many different things. But one of the things that he’s remembered for is this quote which I’m going to have Sara from my office read.
  • [00:02:03] Quote by optometrist John Streff. When vision is working well it guides and leads. When it does not it interferes.
  • [00:02:10] I love this quote because it explains a lot about how optometrists approach patients and their vision. And you’ll notice it doesn’t say anything about 20/20 or visual acuity. We’re going to have some episodes on that topic in the future but I’ll just mention it briefly now. When we say somebody has 20/20 vision, what that really means is somebody has the ability to see small characters that are about eight millimeters high from about six meters away. And that’s all it says. It just means that your visual clarity is of a certain amount and that’s important. It’s important in some circumstances more than others. But it’s really not the main thing that is important about vision. What is important is does somebody’s visual system, their eyes and their brain and their body working together; Does it help them accomplish the things they want to do? Or does it cause problems that hinders that person in the things that they want to do? And I want to take three examples today. These are examples that Optometrists like Dr. Beth and myself, we think about literally every day when we are working with patients.Best OrthoKeratology eye doctor in tampa
  • [00:03:36] The first one is the act of reading, both learning to read and being able to read for long periods of time so that we could absorb lots of information quickly. Reading is extremely complicated. Yes you have to have a certain amount of visual clarity to be able to see the letters and words on the page. But reading has much more to do with how the eyes move and how they focus and how they work together as a team and how long somebody can read with comfort. When the eyes are working well with the brain and the body, then it leads to efficient reading; eye movements are smooth and they are consistent and they’re accurate. And it doesn’t lead to re-reading or making mistakes or skipping words or skipping lines. If the words are comfortably in focus and patients don’t have to bring their head closer to the book or a page or don’t have to hold things further away or they don’t get headaches from trying to do all those things, then it makes it efficient. If the eyes are having discomfort, then it interferes and it makes reading more difficult. Likewise, it’s helpful if words look single and clear and look like they stay in place when we’re reading them so that it’s not frustrating. It interferes if the eyes don’t work well together and the words will jumble up or split apart into two or look like they’re moving around on the page and that will cause interference of reading. And so these visual skills I’m talking about have very little to do with what visual acuity somebody has and many other skills that if they work well together help somebody become a good proficient reader and they can learn a lot and take in a lot of visual information and if they don’t it can cause problems that make it difficult to become a good reader. So that’s one example that we deal with everyday.
  • [00:05:53] Another example is sports. Vision has so much to do with sports that there’s a whole section of Optometry called Sports Vision and Sports Vision training helps people who already have very good visual skills become even better. And that is how they get an edge on other players and their competitors. So if you’re playing almost any sport but certainly a sport that involves a fast-paced movement and throwing and catching those sorts of things you want to have very good spatial awareness and peripheral vision and visual reaction time. Now Dr. Beth is really more of a Sports Vision person in our practice so she can talk more about this in later episodes. If you have those skills it will enhance your ability to perform well on the field. If you don’t have good peripheral vision and visual reaction time and good depth perception and spatial awareness, it’s much more likely to interfere with your ability to make judgments and throw and catch in a way that makes you as competitive as possible. And that’s why people will seek out improvements in visual skills to improve their sports performance.
  • [00:07:13] And then the last area that I wanted to mention is something that many adults do almost every day especially here in Tampa, Florida and that is driving. So we kind of take driving for granted and we kind of take vision for granted. When your eyes and your brain work well together then you can do lots of different visual tasks all at once. You can read signs you can see when cars are in front of you and behind, you you can be aware of somebody is changing lanes. And that’s what we assume will happen when vision works well. It leads you to make better safer decisions about driving. People who have visual problems whether it’s after an accident or other sorts of injuries they all of a sudden realize that vision interferes dramatically with driving. They might have double vision when they’re driving. They might become visually overwhelmed and have trouble making decisions about which lane to be in or whether to go or whether to not go. Or they might not be able to use their peripheral vision to the best of their ability. And so they’re constantly having to look around to judge what other cars are doing. And so that’s a situation where vision can interfere with somebody’s ability to drive safely. Now the important thing about all three of these examples whether it’s reading, whether it’s sports, or whether it’s driving, is in all of these cases these are visual skills that can be improved that can minimize when vision interferes with everyday life and enhance how vision leads and guides you. And that can happen in all different kinds of ways it happens over time as people become more confident and more aware. It happens when we prescribe the best possible glasses or contacts or other sorts of procedures like Ortho-K to improve their vision. And it can happen through either vision therapy to improve skills or deficits that people have. Or through vision training to take vision and make it even better than it already is. Vision is something that fluctuates. It responds to stressful situations and relax situations and it responds to practice and responds to self-awareness. And that is exactly the way optometrists think about vision; is something that can be developed. It can be improved and it can be done so in our conscious cognitive way. And we’re going to talk more about those things. I want to mention that in John Streff’s honor, there has been created a Vision Leads Foundation.
  • [00:09:53] So recognizing his tremendous impact on Optometry as a profession and all of his patients the goal of this non-profit organization is to improve access to care for the patients who need it. And you can find out more about that organization at www.visionleadsfoundation.com. If you have any questions about this concept or if you have any other feedback like I said, you can e-mail us at office@brighteyestampa.com. I really look forward to talking about these sorts of concepts more and in the meantime.
  • [00:10:28] Everybody stay cool.

Thank you for listening. If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, you can email us at office@brighteyestampa.com.

The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Background music: Chopin via MusOpen.com.

Podcast Episode #1 – Who We Are

Note: This is the first episode of our new podcast that will cover all aspects of vision care. You can listen in the player below or read the transcript. The show is available via Stitcher, Google Play, iTunes, and the webplayer below. You can find all episodes here. If you have any suggestions for future episodes, please email office@BrightEyesTampa.com.

-Dr. Nate

Episode 1 transcript:

Dr. Nate: [00:00:00] From sunny Tampa Bay is the Bright Eyes podcast. This is episode number one. I’m Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford.

Dr. Beth: [00:00:09] And I am Dr. Beth Knighton.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:11] And today’s episode is all about us. In the future, we’re going to talk about different aspects of eyes and vision care and different things that you can do to take care of your eyes and improve your vision. But for today since this is our very first podcast episode we’re going to introduce you a little bit about us our practice and how we do things. So how are you feeling, Beth?

Dr. Beth: [00:00:39] I’m feeling great.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:41] Are you excited?Warford 2597 color 239x300

Dr. Beth: [00:00:42] Yes.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:42] Are you excited to be doing podcasts?

Dr. Beth: [00:00:44] Yeah. 🙂

Dr. Nate: [00:00:46] So first off, I have lots of experience in podcasting. My first podcast was in 2010 to 2013. I also do another podcast with an ophthalmologist which we do every month and I think it is a wonderful medium to share information. I’m an avid podcast listener. I listen to podcasts literally every day. So I think it’s fantastic and I’m excited to do it. What about your experience?

Dr. Beth: [00:01:19] Yes I am excited to do this new adventure here learning about podcasts and getting our information out there to everybody.

Dr. Nate: [00:01:29] Great. So a little bit about me. I grew up in north central Florida and I went to University of Florida. I got my Optometry degree at the Illinois College of Optometry in Chicago. I did my residency in Pediatric Vision and Vision Therapy also at ICO and then we moved back to Florida and we opened Bright Eyes Family Vision Care here in Westchase in 2006. We’ve been working here for the last 11 years. I say we because my wife Cristina is the office manager and we’ve grown from a tiny office with just a handful of staff to two offices with about 16 staff members.Dr EK Pic 224x300

Dr. Beth: [00:02:16] I grew up in Clearwater, Florida. I went to the University of South Florida in Tampa for my undergraduate degree and then I also went to the Illinois College of Optometry in Chicago like Dr. Nate and went on to do my Pediatric Residency at the University of Houston in Texas and I stayed on there teaching for a little while. But Florida is my home and I was able to come back this way. So now back in the Tampa Bay area I reached out to Dr. Nate. And at that time he was looking to expand to create the second office which is Bright Eyes Kids and so I was able to join the Bright Eyes family in 2014 and started out part time and grew as the practice did. And now here at the Bright Eyes Westchase office and the Bright Eyes Kids office full time with Dr. Nate

Dr. Nate: [00:03:17] Yes. And it is fantastic. I love having a doctor that I can work with and ask questions to and we can talk about cases and different experiences even though we both went to the same optometry school we did different residencies and so we have different experiences and that helps us serve our patients better.

Dr. Beth: [00:03:44] And it’s really great – it is a lot of fun.

Dr. Nate: [00:03:48] Dr. Beth spends a little bit more time at the family practice. I spend a little bit more time at the kids office and that’s primarily just because she lives closer to the Westchase office and I live closer to the New Tampa office because we’re both plenty capable of doing both but we have a lot of fun.

Dr. Beth: [00:04:09] We really like our job and working with patients of all ages. It’s surprising to people when they find out that we routinely see patients that are six months old. Sometimes a little younger. It’s something that we really enjoy.

Dr. Nate: [00:04:28] What do you do when you’re not working with patients.

Dr. Beth: [00:04:33] I love spending time with my family and I especially love spending time out on my small sailboat. I love being outside doing pretty much anything whether it’s camping or biking. We always love being outside and Florida is a great place to be doing all those things as opposed to our cold winters that we had in Chicago.

Dr. Nate: [00:05:01] It was cold. It’s true. I also like doing things outside. I like to run and go camping. We have a lot of people in my family who play music and so we make music and I like to read and spend time with my family. And sometimes when we have time we like to travel and I’d say that’s mostly what we do.

Dr. Nate: [00:05:31] So we’re going to cover many topics about eyes and vision glasses contacts and vision therapy and Ortho-K. What other topics are we going to cover?

Dr. Beth: [00:05:45] We’re going to cover brain injuries and how that affects the eyes. We will cover why sunglasses are important for your vision and even topics about certain eye diseases you may have heard of like cataracts and macular degeneration.

Dr. Nate: [00:06:02] Yes. So thank you for listening to our very first episode ever. If you have any questions comments or suggestions you can e-mail us at office@BrightEyesTampa.com. Until next time. Have fun and be safe.

If you have questions about your or your children’s eyes or vision please call us at 813-792-0637 or use the button below to request an appointment.
Schedule An Appointment

Brought to you by Bright Eyes Family Vision Care and Bright Eyes Kids. Find previous episodes and more detailed information at BrightEyesTampa.com. Creative Commons Copyright attribution, non-commercial use.

The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro and outro music by Lucas Warford.

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