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Dr. Nate Gives Lecture on Myopia Control to Optometrists

Recently, Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford and Dr. Beth Knighton attended the Hillsborough Society of Optometrists annual Fall Classic. They showcased Bright Eyes Family and Bright Kids at the exhibit hall and talked with area optometrists. Additionally, Dr. Nate gave a lecture about the latest research in myopia control and ways that optometrists keep nearsightedness from increasing. As you can see, it was a packed house.

 

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Podcast Episode #2: What is an Optometrist? (The 5 O’s)

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

For episode #2 of the Bright Eyes Podcast, Dr. Nate and Dr. Beth discuss the differences and similarities between the 5 O’s:

  • Optometrists
  • Ophthalmologists
  • Opticians
  • Orthoptists
  • Ocularists


Transcript:

Dr. Beth: [00:00:03] From rainy Tampa Bay it’s the Bright Eyes podcast. This is episode number two. I’m Dr. Beth Knighton.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:10] And I am Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford.

Dr. Beth: [00:00:13] And today’s episode is all about what is an optometrist.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:18] That’s right. But first Beth I need to acknowledge the elephant in the room and that is it really does not sound like we’re recording this in a professional recording studio in New York with hundreds of thousands of dollars of equipment. You know why that is?

Dr. Beth: [00:00:36] Because we’re in our office on the laptop.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:41] It’s true we’ve got our Blue Yeti microphone and our laptop in the blue exam room in Bright Eyes Family Vision Care and it doesn’t sound perfect but it sounds OK. And hopefully over time as we do more of these we will make it sound a little bit better. I was too impatient to get started with the podcast. So here we are.

staffDr. Beth: [00:01:13] So I get asked a lot about what the difference is between an optometrist and an ophthalmologist. And the main difference between the two is surgical treatment. So optometrists and ophthalmologists are trained in eye disease and how the eye works. But we take it from slightly different perspectives, so an optometrist will look more at the functional aspects of eyes and vision how they work as a team versus a ophthalmologist who will look at it from an eye disease standpoint deciding if surgery or laser treatment or other options are needed. And so we both are critical to the eye care world without one or the other. It would really be difficult for our patients. And so the better that we can work as a team and be on board together for our patients it provides better outcomes for everybody.

Dr. Nate: [00:02:24] Yeah I agree with that. I think that as a general rule optometrists tend to think more about vision and vision development as people grow from being infants to toddlers to kids to teenagers to adults how their vision changes and what their visual needs are. I think the ophthalmologists that I know some of my friends who are ophthalmologists they tend to think more about how the eyes grow and how the eyes age and what kind of diseases the eyeballs themselves can get. And that would include everything from cataracts and glaucoma and diseases related to diabetes. And any of those things. And like Dr. Beth said both are extremely important but they do have slightly different perspectives.

Dr. Beth: [00:03:24] The training for the two is similar but different. And that optometrists and ophthalmologists go for their undergraduate degree, four years of that then optometrists go on to optometry school for four years. And of the optometrists who graduate some of them choose to go on for residency for further training. Like Dr. Nate and I did in pediatrics specifically, but there are lots of specialties that optometrists can go into. And ophthalmologist when they leave under-graduate go on to four years of medical school where they learn eyes and body and then go on to do a three to five year residency in ophthalmology or their specialty and potentially onto fellowship after that for further training. So that’s the difference between an optometrist and an ophthalmologist. But then there’s also an optician. And so Nate you want to tell us a little bit about that.

Dr. Nate: [00:04:29] So before I went to optometry school my wife Cristina was getting her masters at the University of Wisconsin – Madison I was an optician. An optician is somebody who is specially trained in the fitting and fabrication and fixing and dispensing of glasses. And in some states those are licensed in Florida you can get an optician license but you don’t have to have one. In some states they’re not licensed. So I had the experience of being an optician and working with glasses and one of my favorite things about being an optician was repairing glasses when they appeared to be hopelessly damaged. Sometimes you have to be very creative to fix glasses so that people can use them until they’re able to purchase a new pair.

Dr. Beth: [00:05:33] We’ve seen some come into the office that have been pretty mangled at that time. It’s true. So what about orthoptists? Some people have heard of that. How does that fit in?

Dr. Nate: [00:05:46] So an orthoptist is a form of vision therapist that works with ophthalmologists. I’ve known a few orthoptists. Unfortunately they are kind of a vanishing breed. They used to be much more common when ophthalmologists provided more visual training or vision therapy to help improve the functional vision of patients. They don’t tend to do that as much. And so they don’t have the orthtopists to help them develop the skills for patients but they are very dedicated and knowledgeable people they know a whole lot about the eyes and how they move and focus and coordinate vision.

Dr. Nate: [00:06:37] And then there’s one more and that is an ocularist. And an ocularist makes prosthetic eyes. Or sometimes people call them up Glass-Eye even though they’re not glass but they are fake. I have somebody either didn’t develop an eye properly or they lost it due to trauma or some sort of injury. Yes they are extremely talented artists that make prosthetic that’s comfortable for patients and it’s hand-painted to match the other eye as closely as possible. I always think that that’s fascinating work.

Dr. Nate: [00:07:19] There are some really great videos and some of these topics. There is a wonderful video that says “I am a Doctor of Optometry” (below) and we’ll put that in the show notes. There’s another video about what an optometrist is and there’s some ones about opticians and ocularists. So all of those.

Dr. Beth: [00:07:43] Thank you all for listening. If you have any questions comments or suggestions you can e-mail us at office@BrightEyesTampa.com. Until next time stay dry.

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Thank you for listening. If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, you can email us at office@brighteyestampa.com.

The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro/outro music by Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Bright Eyes Kids is Open!

 

This is no April Fool’s joke! Bright Eyes Kids is open!

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This is the moment that we have been waiting for…We are ready to see general children’s appointments at Bright Eyes Kids, as well as Vision Therapy, and Orthokeratology patients! 🙂

Bright Eyes Kids is the only optometry office around dedicated specifically to children’s vision. We do care the same great infants and children’s glasses that you can find at Bright Eyes Family Vision Care. The new office is located at 15303 Amberly Drive Suite C, Tampa, FL, 33647. It is office Bruce B. Downs, near the Bank of America and LA Fitness. The hours currently are Monday and Tuesday 9am to 5pm.

If you have a special child in your life that needs their eyes and vision checked, call us at 813-792-0637 (yes, the same number as Bright Eyes Family Vision Care) for more information or make an appointment. Bright Eyes Kids also has its own Facebook page.

Dr. Nate

By Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
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Bright Eyes Family Vision Care Now Featuring Tomato Eyeglasses for Kids!

 

Dr. Nate’s note: Don’t forget we the only location in Tampa that has Tomato Glasses in stock! Come get them at the Great Glasses Play Day Sunday August 4!

My 5-year-old daughter wears glasses. I want her to pick out her own frames – ones that not only look cute, but also fit well and feel comfortable all day.

For a parent searching for the perfect pair of eyeglasses for your child, the options can be confusing. You’ll see plenty of children’s eyeglass frames, but which will your child actually wear and last longer than the ride home? I have an answer for you.

From my personal experience as a parent and working with young children, Tomato Active frames are the best option for fun and function. Why?

  • Tomato Active frames are made just for infants, toddlers, and kids. Made from a lightweight safety plastic material, Tomato Active frames are durable and flexible. These frames are great for the playground, even sturdy enough to sleep in without breaking or getting bent out of shape.
  • Tomato Active frames WILL fit your child perfectly! Rubber temple tips (pieces that go around the ear) are comfortable and we will adjust them to fit behind your child’s ear just right – not too long or too tight! Nose pads come in 3 different sizes to ensure a proper bridge fit. Every frame comes with a useful strap that does not rub, pull, or irritate your child’s head.
  • Tomato Active frames are cute and colorful. From flowers and cars to simple pastels, your child will find something to fit their personality.
  • Tomato Active frames are a great value – affordable and long-lasting!

One parent brought her kid in to Bright Eyes because his glasses were constantly falling down. A Tomato active frame was adjusted to fit him perfectly, so it didn’t slide down his face. His mom loved it so much, she bought a second pair!

Here at Bright Eyes, each child is evaluated individually to make sure every pair of glasses they receive are fitting correctly. It is important that the glasses stay in place, because kids tend to look over the top of slipping glasses instead of pushing them back up where they belong. And kids are far likelier to wear glasses if they like them!

But you do not have to take my word for it. Look at this email I got from a happy parent:

Big THANK YOU to JADE for all her help today getting some TOMATO frames ordered for my daughter! She was friendly, helpful and efficient and I just wanted to let you know I appreciated her! Thanks for employing outstanding staff! I look forward to getting my daughters first pair of frames!

Thanks Again!

Bring your child to Bright Eyes Family Vision Care, where our main concern is your child’s eye care needs.

Jade Kowalick,
Children’s Frame Specialist

Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
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Questions About LASIK? Join us at FREE LASIK Consultation Day – July 18

Do you struggle with the idea of getting LASIK? Maybe you think you want to do it, but don’t even know if you are a candidate? Do you have more questions that you need to have answered in order to feel comfortable making the decision? Well, we can help! On Thursday, July 18, we will be having a FREE LASIK consultation day. TLC Laser Eye Center Customer Care Representative Susan Santangelo will be providing in-depth information about blade-free technology, the cost of LASIK, and of course, the qualifications for LASIK.

  • How safe is LASER VISION CORRECTION?

  • Is LASIK right for me?

  • How much does it cost?

  • What is “BLADE-FREE” Technology?

A lot of people are tired of wearing glasses; they’re inconvenienced by contacts, and they just want to be able to go to the beach…and see. Stop by on July 18 and get all of your questions answered by the professionals. Call us to make an appointment for this FREE consultation, and find out how you could save $400 for LASIK! This could be a life-changing decision!

You can check out TLC’s website for information on the different types of LASIK.

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All the best!

Dr. Nate

By Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
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Legalese: THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.

 

AOA School Readiness Summit: Focus on Vision

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The American Optometric Association recently held a School Readiness Summit: Focus on Vision in which doctors, nurses, educators and advocates for children’s health gathered to examine learning-related vision issues that are keeping children from achieving in the classroom. This summit was created to address the concerns that our current system is flawed and a policy shift is needed. The problem is that currently, the U.S. educational system and some health care providers rely heavily on vision screenings to discover the kids that need comprehensive exams. These screenings do catch some types of vision problems but they can miss about 75% of those children that have learning-related vision problems. Detecting these vision problems is very important as “studies show that much of what children learn comes though vision, and undetected and untreated eye and vision disorders in children, such as amblyopia and strabismus, can result in vision loss, additional costly treatments, delayed reading and poorer outcomes in school.”

The take-home statement that the summit produced is that comprehensive eye exams must serve as the foundation to determine school readiness in school-aged children. Another important point established at this meeting is the establishment of the link between healthy vision and classroom learning.

This historic summit is an important step in ensuring that children receive the proper detection and treatment of vision problems before they become detrimental to their learning. Here at Bright Eyes Family Vision Care, we are excited to see these changes being made, since it has been our goal from the beginning to not only catch vision problems at an early stage, evidenced by the InfantSEE program that we offer that provides free eye exams to infants between the age of 6 months and 1 year of age, but to also treat certain types of problems through our extensive one-on-one vision therapy program.

If you have any questions regarding the InfantSEE program, vision therapy program, or would like to schedule a comprehensive eye exam for your child before they start school, give our office a call or come in to schedule.

All the best,

Justin Schoonover, CPO

Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
Located in the Westchase area of Tampa.
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Questions and Answers about Video Games and Vision

I was originally asked these questions by email for an interview about video games and vision. I was excited because there are a lot of myths and misconceptions about how video games can affect your eyes. Unfortunately, the interview was not published, so I decided to print them here. If you have questions like this, please let me know. -Dr. Nate

Does playing video games cause more stress to the eyes than watching tv?

Playing video games is considerably more stressful for the eyes than watching TV, but it depends a lot on which form the games take. Games on the TV like Playstation and Xbox are different than games on the computer, such as World of Warcraft, which are different than handheld games like those for Nintendo DS (and soon 3DS).

The visual system is designed for looking at things far away without effort, assuming the eyes are healthy and, if needed, the correct glasses or contacts are being worn. When looking up-close, the eyes have to change focus and position. The, over time, adds up in a big way. If the visual system is overwhelmed, gamers can have blurry vision, eye strain or headaches. If the eyes are too stressed to move properly, double vision and reduced performance can result. All this is made worse under stressful situations, overall fatigue, and times of extended mental concentration.

As a former gamer (before I had kids), I know that an awesome video game is much more likely to generate stressful situations, require extended mental concentration, and lead to fatigue from sleep deprivation than a random TV show. So gamers are already predisposed to have eye and vision problems.

But here is an additional twist: When we are under stress we have a “fight or flight” response. In this situation, our eyes are evolutionarily adapted to focus in the distance. This was useful when we were hunters and gatherers to help us see what we were hunting and what was hunting us. But it’s counter-productive when at the computer.

Finally, it’s known that people blink much less at the computer than at other times – as much as 60% less. When people don’t blink, the moisture on their eyes evaporates leading to dry, burning, irritated eyes and blurry vision. All of these things together are referred to as Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS.) Although CVS gets more attention in the workplace, it applies to recreational computer users, too.

What’s the best advice for video gamers regarding eye fatigue?

Hands down, the best advice is to take frequent breaks. There is a rule of thumb that eye doctors tell patients called the “20/20/20 Rule.” This means that every 20 minutes, look away from the screen at something specific at least 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds, like a clock or a picture. When looking away blink your eyes several times and take deep, relaxing breaths.

When looking away, take note if the object you’re looking at in the distance starts off blurry and then slowly gets clear, as this is an indication that your eyes are working too hard and that you should take a longer break. Unfortunately, that is much easier said than done, because video games are extremely engaging. When gamers are “in the zone” they often don’t stop to eat or drink, let alone take a 20/20/20 Rule break. Some people will put post-it notes on the monitors or set alarms to remind them.

Also, set up your gaming environment ergonomically. Make sure that your monitor is approximately two feet away from your eyes and not at an unusual angle. It’s best if there are soft lights on in the room so there’s not a big brightness difference between the screen and the surrounding space.

Remember to talk to your eye doctor during your annual exam about your computer use – both work AND at home. Let him or her know if you experience blurriness, fatigue, double vision, burning or discomfort at the computer. Some people think those things are just “normal” and ignore it, but that isn’t a good idea. Sometimes these symptoms are the sign of more significant underlying problems. Your doctor can do specialized testing to determine the problem. You may be given a prescription for special eyeglasses for the computer, eye drops to use, or a recommendation for therapeutic techniques called vision therapy.

Dr. Nate

Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
Located in the Westchase area of Tampa.
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Vision Therapy Video

This video is the first in a series by my friend and mentor, optometrist Dr. John Abbondanza, about vision therapy:

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Be Well!

Dr. Nate

Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
Located in the Westchase area of Tampa.
Dr Nate Google PlusBright Eyes Tampa on Google PlacesBright Eyes Tampa on FacebookBright Eyes Tampa on TwitterBright Eyes Tampa on YelpBright Eyes Tampa on foursquareWestchase Patch

What is so special about Lightec eyewear?

Here at Bright Eyes, we are proud to offer unique, high-quality eyewear. We are excited to announce that Lightec is our newest line of frames. Made by Morel in France, these glasses continue our tradition of offering high quality and good-looking eyewear!

The name LIGHTEC comes from “lightness” and “technology” which allows for maximum comfort. The lightweight stainless steel frames offer flexibility and durability. The high-tech spring hinges have no screws or internal hinges, meaning they are strong and secure. Lightec frames are available in a variety of eyeglass styles – full metal frame, semi-rimless and fully rimless – for men and women looking for fashion-forward, immediately comfortable frames.

We also feature the Lightec Carbon fiber frames – the temples are made with composite carbon and glass fiber materials for an amazing high-tech look. Take a look:

Lighttec Carbon Eyeglasses

Stop by Bright Eyes Family Vision Care for our Eyewear Show on February 12 to see the whole Lightec collection, and save 25% off Lightec glasses – frames and lenses! If you buy any 2nd pair, you will receive 50% off the lesser priced frame. (Prescription or non-prescription sunglasses included!)

And if you bring a friend to the show, you will receive an extra $25 off your purchase. We would love to show them our optical and give them a chance to meet our optometrist, Dr. Bonilla-Warford.

Cristina Bonilla-Warford
Office Manager
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
Located in the Westchase area of Tampa.

 

Glaucoma, the Silent Thief of Sight

It can come with no warning and no noticeable symptoms. It is the second most common cause of blindness in the United States. “IT” is Glaucoma, the Silent Thief of Sight.

January is National Glaucoma Awareness Month and we encourage all people, especially those at higher risk for this disease, to familiarize themselves with the potential symptoms and need for regular eye examinations. A regular eye examination is especially critical since a person with early-stage Glaucoma may not notice any symptoms at all. While the early stage symptoms may not be noticeable, persons with more advanced Glaucoma may notice blurred vision, the presence of halos around lights, loss of peripheral vision and difficulty focusing on objects.

Glaucoma affects an estimated 4 million Americans. Some people are more at risk than others. Those at higher risk include:

  • People over the age of 60
  • African-Americans over age 40
  • People with diabetes
  • Individuals that have experienced a serious eye injury
  • Anyone with a family history of glaucoma

Glaucoma

Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
Located in the Westchase area of Tampa.

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