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Update: Contact Lenses and Coronavirus

We know that it is “information overload” right now, but we wanted to provide an update that is relevant to many of our patients: Contact lenses. Although the CDC has recommended refraining from routine eyecare visits, there is NO recommendation that you discontinue contact lens wear. You can wear contacts. Yes, there is a recommendation that all people try not to touch our eyes, nose, and mouth. As a contact lens wearer this is difficult.

In general, and specifically right now to reduce possible coronavirus infection, we always recommend that you wash your hands thoroughly (there is no shortage of ways to help you do that) before insert and removing contact lenses. Also follow all manufacturer recommendations and doctor recommendations.

If you will be needing a supply of contact lenses in the next 2-3 months you can order them here. We will soon be closing to non-urgent visits; however we are available by phone, text, and email, to help you. To help you out, we are extending contact lens prescriptions on a case by case basis without an evaluation. We are not sure how long the distributors will have contact lenses available so you may want to order sooner rather than later.

Please let us know what questions you have!

 

-Dr. Nate, Dr. Beth, and the Bright Eyes Staff.

 

 

Order contacts through Bright Eyes NEW Contact Lens Webstore!

BE BlogPostGraphic

At Bright Eyes, we take the health and safety of our staff and patients very seriously. Nationwide, people are practicing social distancing and enhanced hygiene to avoid the coronavirus.

While we are not usually crowded at Bright Eyes, we are adjusting the flow of patients overall – to continue to offer services, while keeping patient-to-patient contact to a minimum.

Want to order contacts, but don’t want to travel to the office?

Check out Bright Eyes’ new contact lens webstore: https://brighteyes.myclstore.com/

Enter your prescription yourself, or call the office and we will enter your prescription into the system.

We already offer competitive pricing, compared with major online retailers. Through April 30, we are adding special promos on all contact lens orders:

  • Extra 10% off our already competitive pricing (in-office or online)
  • If you buy an annual supply of contacts, you are eligible for an extra 10% off – meaning 20% off your contact lens order! (Please call or email our office to receive this extra discount!)
  • Free shipping for any number of boxes.

 

Many people don’t realize that Bright Eyes is a family-owned business, not a chain optical! Support your local business while enjoying the convenience of shopping online!

Thank you for your business! If there is anything we can do to help, just let us know.

 

-Dr. Nate and the Bright Eyes Staff

 

 

 

Podcast Episode #15: Myopia Management With Esther Rodas

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

In this episode, Dr. Nate talks with Optician Esther Rodas about Myopia and the treatment options to control it.

You can listen in the player below or read the transcript. The show is available via Stitcher, Google Play, iTunes, and the webplayer below. You can find all previous episodes here. If you have any questions or suggestions for future episodes, please email office@BrightEyesTampa.com.

Previous relevant episodes:


Full Transcript:

Introduction [00:00:10] Welcome to the Bright Eyes podcast. Advice for healthy vision for all ages. Your hosts are doctor Nate Bonilla-Warford and Dr. Beth Knighton. Residency trained optometrist providing eye care to all ages with exams for glasses and contacts and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, Ortho-kertology and sports vision training. Their mission is to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional and individualized eyecare.

Dr. Nate [00:00:38] From rainy Tampa Bay. It’s the Bright Eyes podcast.This is episode number 15. I’m Dr. Nate Bonilla-Waford and today’s episode is all about myopia control. I’d like to introduce our special guest today this is Esther Rodas. Esther is an Optician. She works here at Bright Eyes and not only is she an optician, she’s our myopia control coordinator so Hi Esther.

Esther [00:01:05] Hello everyone. So Esther here just like Dr. Nate just mentioned and been here for about a couple of years and usually I will be the one that you talk to if you have any questions on myopia control and scheduling and all of that good stuff.

Dr. Nate [00:01:21] Absolutely. And when Esther joined us she was a student at the Hillsborough Community College in the opticianry program. And now that she’s got her license she works with us full time and we are so lucky to have her and patients just love her and all the staff does too.

Esther [00:01:37] Happy to be here.

Dr. Nate [00:01:38] Excellent. So Esther we introduced myopia in episode six as part of our refractive error episode. And here’s our vision therapist Miriam giving the definition of myopia.

Miriam [00:01:56] Myopia, aka nearsightedness is a condition where objects up close appear clearly while objects far away appear blurry. With myopia, light comes to focus in front of the retina instead of on the retina.

Dr. Nate [00:02:10] So myopia is all about nearsightedness. It’s all about not being able to see very far away without either contacts or glasses or lenses of some sort or for adults they can consider refractive surgery like LASIK. From your perspective Esther when a doctor diagnoses a child with myopia what are some of the most common questions that parents will ask you?

Esther [00:02:36] Definitely first thing they ask is if it’s permanent. If it’ll get better the older that they get?

Dr. Nate [00:02:43] Right. And that’s one of the questions that they ask us doctors are very first thing. They’re like, are they going to outgrow this? Are these glasses that they need? Or is this something that after a while they won’t need anymore? And one of the things about myopia that’s important to understand is while we see it as vision getting blurrier or glasses getting thicker or stronger, what’s really happening in myopia is the eye ball itself is stretching, it’s getting longer and getting bigger and it’s much easier for the eye tissue to stretch and elongate rather than it is to shrink and get smaller. And so for that reason when we’re talking about myopia I like to say it’s a one way street but it doesn’t really get better. And so after they kind of digest that what are the next questions that parents will ask you?

Esther [00:03:40] So once they know what can potentially happen and the inside of the eye they definitely know the options at that point what they can do to limit that progression.

Dr. Nate [00:03:51] Right. And so when I talked to parents, we always talk about myopia as a condition that needs to be managed. It’s not just in one point in time it’s a lifetime of change that we need to think about. We always talk about myopia in the short term and in the long term. So in the short term, kids need to be able to see, they need to be able to see the board at school, they need to be able to see for sports they need to be able to function in everyday life. There’s a variety of different ways that we can help them be able to see clearly and that’s the common things that people are familiar with glasses, contacts, the night time treatment contacts of ortho-K can help people see clearly. So there’s different options and we need to address that first because it’s very important that we make sure that kids have useful vision for living their lives. But, we also need to make sure that we are addressing the long term component. Because myopia tends to worsen and sometimes more dramatically in some patients rather than others- we need to make sure we’re addressing that and offering different kinds of treatments to hopefully reduce the risk of progression. So in our office Esther, what are the three main ways that we use to reduce the progression of myopia?

Esther [00:05:26] We offer here the Atropine medicated eyedrops as one solution. We offer Ortho-keratology which is the night time lenses and we also offer specialty designs soft multi-focal lenses to help with that progression.

Dr. Nate [00:05:46] Right. And we feel very strongly not just with myopia but with all of our patient care that every option needs to be tailored individually to the patient. So it’s not one size fits all. It’s not that every single patient who comes in needs any one particular treatment but it depends on their lifestyle,it depends on their goals,it depends on their genetics,it depends on if they’re more likely to progress. So very briefly we’ll just go over what these options are. The first one which is the most easy to administer are the Atropine eye drops. Now, atropine is a medication that dilate the pupils and it reduces the eyes ability to focus. And for that reason, it hasn’t been widely used in the United States. It’s used for many many conditions but not for myopia control. Until recently when it was discovered that you could use a very low concentration to minimize the side effects. So we have many patients who are on the low concentration atropine treatment to reduce the likelihood of progression. We don’t know exactly how the atropine works, what it’s doing in the eyes but it’s been shown in many many many studies to be effective. So that’s that’s one option. The other option like Esther said was the multifocal contacts.The multi-focal contacts are worn in the daytime just like any other soft contact that you’d be familiar with. But it has a special optical treatment which provides some stimulus to the eye that reduces its need or its inclination to to get worse. We can optically change how the light focus is on the back of the eye to reduce that stimulus to progress and get worse. And so that’s the daytime contacts. The nighttime contacts the Ortho-K does the same thing optically, but it actually reshapes the eyes so that you can see clearly without daytime contacts or glasses. So you get a little bit of a two for one with ortho-K which is great. So once we do the exam and we take lifestyle into account, we look at all of the the treatment options and I will recommend a particular treatment option for a patient. I’ll bring them out and then they will go over the details and the logistics of that treatment option with Esther at that point. What kind of questions do you get?

Esther [00:08:24] So definitely the top question which you kind of touched on right now is their parents are only super interested and intrigued of like the science behind each one and the how is it that the atropine, the multi focal and that the nighttime lends aid in hopefully limiting that progression of the nearsightedness for their child. So anything you can add to what you just said.

Dr. Nate [00:08:48] So the interesting thing about myopia control is even though there are many many scientific papers exploring how well these different options work and how they relate to each other- we don’t thoroughly understand exactly how they work. We have a pretty good idea of how the optical effects of the multi focal contacts on the ortho-K works to reduce that stimulus to progress. We really don’t know as much about how the atropine works. We know that atropine has been used for hundreds and hundreds of years and it’s been used for many many conditions and it’s extremely safe to use. We don’t know what’s exactly going on at the molecular level to help keep the eyes from progressing, but we do know it’s very effective. I know the parents don’t think that that’s a super satisfying answer but it is the honest answer at this point. So what other questions do parents ask you?

Esther [00:09:45] Definitely risks. They want to know what kind of risks are involved and short term risks and long term risk as well. So for example the night time contacts as they are more rigid than the soft lenses. And they always want to know what the risks are for abrasions and things like that. Almost the same for soft contact lenses for short term risks. Long time parents want to know if the ridgid of lenses will affect the kids eligibility to do maybe LASIK in the future. Parents also ask about any effects that that may have on things such as glaucoma and any long term risks in the medicated eye drops. So it’s kind of like a few questions and one.

Dr. Nate [00:10:34] Well I think that that’s really important topic because with any procedure or with any therapy we always need to weigh the benefits and the risks and that’s part of the discussion that always happens between me and the parents when we’re talking about undertaking one of these treatments. Fortunately in the big picture all of these have been proven to be very safe. And that’s why we can feel comfortable doing them. And that’s why I feel comfortable with both of my children using these different methods. My son uses the medicated eyedrops. And my daughter does the night time Ortho-K lenses. Obviously, if I didn’t feel they were very safe I’d be reluctant to use them with my own kids and I know that lots of doctors around the country and around the world have their own children and in myopia control programs similar to these as well. So let’s talk about the different risks with any contacts. There are certainly risks especially if you don’t use proper hygiene, if you don’t care for them properly. If you use them in a way that you shouldn’t be then you increase those risks. Fortunately all of the scientific studies that have shown that with the Ortho-k lenses for night time don’t have any additional risk compared to traditional contact lens wear. And so that that helps us educate patients properly now. The very first question that people ask me is often, well I was told that I shouldn’t sleep in my contacts because it’s not healthy. So why is it healthy to sleep in these contacts. That’s a great question because it’s true that you shouldn’t sleep in your daytime contacts because one- they’re often not intended for that two- if you’re sleeping in them in the nighttime and then wearing them in the daytime then you’re wearing them for a full 24 or multiple cycles. And that can create problems because the lenses never get cleaned with Ortho-k. One, they are super breathable materials. Two, they’re designed specifically to be worn at night and three they’re only worn for about eight hours at night and then they’re being cleaned and stored the rest of the time. Furthermore the Ortho-k lenses rarely or never leave the house. It’s not like the contact lenses that you wear where you get pollen in them you, get dust in them. If you are out and about your eyes can get sweaty you can get sunblock on them if they goes in your eyes etc. Whereas Ortho-k you put them in before you go to bed you take them out in the morning and they’re clean and so the lenses stay very, very clean and we’re very, very clear about the proper method for keeping the lenses clean. Once we have the proper care method established then the risks go way,way down. It is possible in the short term, if the patient doesn’t have good insertion technique for putting the lenses in to lightly scratch or abrade their eye but that’s very, very rare and when it does happen it’s mild and it resolves right away. Now fortunately, we’ve never had any infection for any of our patients and that is incredibly rare with proper care. That’s the same for our for our soft contact lens patients soft contact lenses are healthier than ever before and the risk of infection is is very, very low. I will add here and I always tell patients all the time, that you should never use tap water or you should never clean your lenses with anything other than solutions that have been provided. You shouldn’t shower or swim or go on lakes or hot tubs with your contact lenses on because that can introduce contaminants or bacteria or amoebas that can cause a severe infection. So I was always educating about that.

Dr. Nate [00:14:48] Regarding the atropine, there are known side effects like I mentioned about sensitivity to light and focusing, but by using the lower concentration those are dramatically reduced. Other than that, the only real side effect that can happen with patients sometimes is if the drops come with a certain preservative and the patients are sensitive to that preservative it can cause an allergic like reaction where the eyes get red and irritated. Many of our patients use non preserved drops and that’s not an issue we haven’t found that to be a common problem. But it’s theoretically possible and some patients you it’s hard to know whether they’re they respond to preservatives or not. In the long term, for long term use- atropine has been used for for many years without any problems or side effects.

Esther [00:15:49] We do go through a couple of compounding pharmacies.

Dr. Nate [00:15:53] Yeah, we do have some options and that’s actually an important point. So if you get the high concentration atropine which we don’t use very often except in the very most stubbornly progressive cases, you can get that at almost any pharmacy because that’s the standard formulation that is used to treat eye disease. The lower concentration is only available through compounding pharmacies and we have a variety of options that we can we can help patients acquire that.

Esther [00:16:25] Have you got at all questions about if it’ll affect someone’s eligibility for LASIK in their future or the glaucoma?

Dr. Nate [00:16:33] Yeah and that’s actually a very common question and it’s a great question because sometimes patients are concerned well maybe this reshaping with Ortho-k reshaping of the cornea will adversely affect them for their chances for Lasik and I say you know exactly the opposite. The goal of Ortho-k is to keep the eyes the prescription is stable enough over the long term so that they remain eligible for for LASIK or refractive surgery. What typically happens is people will do Ortho-k starting when they’re when they’re younger maybe you know 10 or 12 years old and they’ll keep doing it until they’re an adult they might stop at 18 or I had a patient just the other day was 12 and she’s now 30 and she’s been doing it continuously. But if she or other patients wanted to stop as an adult they could wait until their eyes go back to their natural shape and once that’s stable and it’s confirmed to be stable with repeated curvature measurements then they are eligible for LASIK just like any other patient will be.

Esther [00:17:44] How about the glaucoma question?

Dr. Nate [00:17:47] So the glaucoma question is interesting because people worry about glaucoma for this reason- they think the Ortho-k lenses press on the eye to reshape the lenses. And if they’re pressing on the eye then that’s going to increase the pressure inside the eye and if you increase the pressure inside the eye that’s going to increase the risk of optic nerve damage called glaucoma. Now the reason why it is not a risk for glaucoma is because Ortho-k lenses don’t actually work by pressing on the eye what they do is they they are kind of a rigid surface that goes over the cornea and then over time the cornea conforms to that lens it- actually kind of expands outwards to meet the shape of the lens so instead of pressing on the eye, the cornea actually reshapes itself or expands to meet the lens. So there’s no reason to think that the pressure inside the eyes increases when we do Ortho-k and therefore there’s no added risk for it for glaucoma. Again kind of like LASIK, nearsightedness itself is a risk factor for glaucoma if you have very high myopia in nearsightedness you have increased risk for for glaucoma. So it may be that doing Ortho-k might actually help reduce the risk long term of glaucoma.

Esther [00:19:25] That’s great information. Thank you. I would say those are the top questions and the last question that I always get at the very end is if these methods are FDA approved?

Dr. Nate [00:19:38] Right. And so here’s the thing about FDA approval all of these methods are FDA approved for a variety of conditions and treatments but not specifically for reducing the progression of myopia. So we’re very clear when we talk to parents and we have it in writing and we explain that while all of these treatments are scientifically valid and there is many studies that talk about the the benefits that the FDA itself has not gotten around to evaluating yet and stating that these methods are specifically approved for the reduction in the progression of nearsightedness. Many other countries have, and there’s lots of scientific evidence to show that it is, but no the FDA hasn’t. Now, all of these things like the atropine eyedrops are approved for treating many, many kinds of conditions including Amblyopia,which is something that we see in the office a lot. A multi-focal contacts are certainly approved for lots of conditions. Specifically, presbyopia for older adults who need to see up close. Ortho-k, the nighttime contacts is approved for treatment of nearsightedness so that people can see clearly throughout the day, but they haven’t gone that extra step yet in approving it specifically for the reduction in the risk of progression. So that’s something that we think it’s important that people understand it doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t do it, but it is in the state of approval right now.

Dr. Nate [00:21:29] Well, hopefully this has been helpful for people who are interested in learning more about myopia control in the future we hope to have some more episodes detailing how each of these methods work. I think it would be kind of fun to have my kids on and they can talk about their experience. That would be that would be interesting to hear it from their own mouth. And we have lots of other topics in mind if you have any suggestions I have topics that you’d like to hear in the future, please let us know. I’d like to thank Esther for joining us and talking to us today. And is there anything else you wanna say before we go now?

Esther [00:22:16] Thanks for having me and to all those listening to this podcast. If there’s any questions if you want to schedule a myopia consultation with Dr. Nate just ask for myself Esther and be more than happy to answer any questions that I can and get you on our schedule right.

Dr. Nate [00:22:34] And if you want to you can call us at 1-813-792-0637. Or you can e-mail the office at office@BrightEyesTampa.com. Until next time,stay dry.

Outro: [00:22:46] Brought to you by Bright Eyes family vision care and Bright Eyes Kids. Find previous episodes and more detailed information at BrightEyesTampa.com. Creative Commons copyright attribution noncommercial use. The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. There’s no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute a medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis treatment.

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Podcast #10: NaturalVue Contact Lenses with Dr. Douglas Benoit

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

In this episode, Dr. Nate talks with Dr. Douglas Benoit about contact lenses and NaturalVue spherical and multifocal lenses from Visioneering Technologies, Inc.

 

The Full transcript:

Intro: 00:11 Welcome to the bright eyes podcast, advice for healthy vision for all ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla Warford and Dr. Beth Knighton, residency trained optometrist providing eye care to all ages with exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services, including vision therapy, Myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission is to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

Dr. Nate: 00:42 Not far from Clearwater beach, the number one beach in the nation, It is the Bright Eyes Podcast. This is episode number 10. I am Dr Nate Bonilla- Warford, and I have a special guest with me. Dr. Douglas Benoit.

speaker benoit 300×300

Douglas Benoit, OD

Dr. Benoit: 00:42 Hi Nate.

Dr. Nate: 00:42 Hi, how are you?

Dr. Benoit: 00:55 Doing well, how about yourself?

Dr. Nate: 00:56 I’m great. I’m doing really, really well and I’m excited that you are here with us. We’re going to talk about contact lenses, which you have many years of experience with. Before we get into that, why don’t you tell us a little bit about yourself. I’ll give the basics. You’re an optometrist. You’re a fellow of the American Academy of optometry. You’re the director of professional affairs at Visioneering Technologies, Inc, otherwise known as “VTI”.

Dr. Benoit: 01:21 That is correct. I practiced for 34 years in OD, MD group, we were all sub specialty folks. I had the pleasure of working primarily with contact lens patients, generally the type that had special needs such as GP wearers, people that needed scleral lenses, et Cetera, and I had the opportunity to work with a lot of bifocal patients, which was really a passion of mine. I also, over that period of time did a number of clinical studies, which is actually how I became involved with VTI.

Dr. Nate: 01:53 And you’re originally from New Hampshire, but I gather you get around the country quite a bit these days.

Dr. Benoit: 01:58 Yes. As part of the job I do have to travel quite a bit and with some changes that have occurred recently I’m traveling more much to the chagrin of my wife.

Dr. Nate: 02:08 My Dad actually, he does consulting and speaking in the education field and and he’s on the road a lot, but he’s narrowed down his primary gigs to Hawaii and California.

Dr. Benoit: 02:21 Well that would be a nice goal. My wife would like to travel back to California, I’m sure as it is, sometimes she gets to go with me depending on where it is and how much time I’ll actually get to spend with her.

Dr. Nate: 02:32 Right. Absolutely. So. OK, so for our listeners who are patients, we know that there are many contact lens options, uh, for patients, but a lot of times patients don’t really know what their options are or why they should be interested in them. If you’re like me, you’re probably somewhere, a family gathering or a barbecue or almost anywhere and they find out that you’re an optometrist and they always want to say, oh, you, I was told I cannot wear contacts or uh, you know, I tried contacts 15 years ago, you know, and they didn’t work. Do you feel like things have changed a lot since your, you know, your early days with context?

Dr. Benoit: 03:11 Well, yes, they have changed a large, large amount. When I was first in training a 30 some odd years ago, they had pma lenses and they were just coming out with soft materials. Those were two radically different types of contact lenses and it really took a different approach. Over the years, the old hard lenses have changed slightly, the materials now breathe so that they’re much gentler on the tissue of the eye, but the soft lens is really where the large changes have occurred. In the beginning, these lenses were produced in a vial, they were autoclave for sterility and the lenses were very expensive and you tried to keep them for a year or more using very heroic cleaning methods. Over the intervening years we have gotten smarter about the care, so that has become easier. But in the last 15 or so years, the move has been towards daily disposable lenses so that we can eliminate the problem of solution reactions or just poor cleaning. Anybody that has a question about poor cleaning with a contact lens, just think about your teenage son and his room

Dr. Nate: 04:19 Exactly. That’s something I actually mentioned in the, uh, in the exam chair here at Bright Eyes Kids pretty regularly. What are some reasons that patients might want to consider contacts over glasses

Dr. Benoit: 04:32 Well contact lenses do give you the opportunity to do active things such as working out, riding a bike, golf, things of that nature where glasses sometimes could get in the way either by slipping off or steaming up. So contact lenses are really, really nice in that regard. There are some folks that are into theatrical and in certain situations they might not want to be wearing glasses if they’re doing a period piece. So a contact lens there would give them the opportunity to blend in with their surroundings, so to speak.

Dr. Nate: 05:03 And who is a good candidate for contact lenses?

Dr. Benoit: 05:06 Well, I think anyone that’s motivated and has a healthy eye is a good candidate for contact lenses. At, you know, one point they used to tell folks that they had astigmatism, that they really couldn’t wear a contact lens. Uh, thank goodness that actually is not the case. The original contact lenses which were commercially available in the United States back in 1887 were for severely deformed corneas, primarily a very severe form of astigmatism. So that has evolved over the years. We now have many, many ways to correct both astigmatism and the need for a bifocal in a contact lens and there are some instances where we might actually use a contact lens in youngsters to try and prevent changes in their vision.

Dr. Nate: 05:46 Yes. That’s something that we talk about here a lot at Bright Eyes Kids. Now, you know, you mentioned kids, a lot of parents are very surprised to find that we can do contact lenses at all. A lot of people feel like until children are teenagers contact lenses are just not an option. Do you think that that was true previously that we initially started it at teenagers or do you think that was just a myth that sort of came out of nowhere?

Dr. Benoit: 06:17 I think it’s probably a combination. I think it was the comfort level of the doctor and or the parent as far as getting a contact lens on that particular youngster. What I have found over the years is that it really isn’t an age thing so much so maturity level thing. Some youngsters are ready to wear a contact lens at six years old and some won’t ever be ready again think about that teenage boy.

Dr. Nate: 06:41 I agree completely. I think that a motivation is absolutely everything. The worst case scenario in my opinion is when the parent really wants their kids to wear contacts and the kid really does not because if he doesn’t want the lens in his eye, he’s not going to get it in his eyes. There’s just no way, no way around it, but if there’s, if there’s sports, if it’s cosmetic, if there’s some other motivation than kids who can be very successful at wearing contact lenses. Pretty much independent of the age. That’s my experience for sure.

Dr. Benoit: 07:15 I would agree with that.

Dr. Nate: 07:16 What about people who were either bifocals or reading glasses are contact lenses a good option for them?

Dr. Benoit: 07:23 Yes, they are and there are a number of ways that that can be approached. I mean, one of the simplest ways would be to have contact lenses for distance and then put on a pair of reading glasses when you need it to do something on the computer or to read your cell phone, let’s say. But a lot of folks that are interested in contact lenses really don’t want to be bothered wearing glasses at all. And luckily for them, since about 1949, we have had bifocal contact lens is available and the designs that we have currently are really very, very good at correcting most patients needs as I used to, like to tell my patients if they’re motivated and willing to put up with the adaptation to these different optics in these contact lenses, about eighty percent of the time they’ll be able to function very, very normally and not have to rely on glasses at all.

Dr. Nate: 08:12 Yeah. Some of the happiest patients are ones that are so irritated with their reading glasses, misplacing them, having one in every room in the house except for the room that they’re in. And uh, you know, getting those patients into contacts is extremely rewarding.

Dr. Nate: 08:27 Now, when I first got my first pair of contacts, I was in high school, I got one pair, one for each eye. The pair had to last the entire year and I told all my friends, I’m like, Hey, I’m coming to school tomorrow and I’m going to be in my contacts. I’m not going to be wearing my glasses. And the very first morning I let one go down the drain and that was, I don’t know, $80 worth, you know, or something. Nowadays, you know, it, the idea of a fitting a child in an annual lens is just completely unheard of. I definitely have seen in my practice going to the, uh, the daily disposable or single use lenses has dramatically increased the comfort. Um, but most importantly, the health and safety of lenses. You travel around and talk to docs from, from all over. Do you think that that’s something that every doctor’s reporting?

Dr. Benoit: 09:25 I agree with that, yes, the advent of daily disposables of single use lenses has really improved the health of all patients. It makes it a lot easier for travel. If you do have one go down the drain, which you shouldn’t because the water shouldn’t ever be running when you’re doing your contact lenses, but if you should happen to lose a lens in that fashion, you can just open up another lens and put it in your eye. I don’t have to refer it to wearing glasses until you can order a new lens.

vti differenceDr. Nate: 09:50 One of the things that we see as doctors is companies are, you know, they come out with contact lenses on a very regular basis. Sometimes it’s a little bit overwhelming for doctors because there’s just, there’s so many products. However, um, I was very excited when Brian, our rep from, from VTI, from Visioneering Technologies came in, uh, because I had been trying to get my hands on the natural view of Lens set for patients because I’d heard so many good things about it. So why don’t you tell us just a little bit about what sets Natural View apart from some of the other lenses that are out there.

Dr. Benoit: 10:30 Well, the natural view multi-focal contact lens is a one day Lens. It has a center distance design where the majority of multi-focal soft daily disposable lenses are currently center near designs, a the center distance design also uses what we call an extended depth of focus mechanism to actually create the power for reading, so folks that have the need for a bifocal that are say 42 or someone like myself that is 63 can wear the same lens and not have to worry about having a different add power as we call it. So it’s very, very nice for the doctor because you have one shape, one size and this universal add and you don’t have to worry about trying to pick too many parameters at once. So it really makes it very convenient for the doctor.

Dr. Nate: 11:21 So I’m, I’m very happy and very impressed with the lens and the patients have been too, before we wrap up here today, I appreciate your, your time. I appreciate you coming to the office. It’s always fun to be able to record in person as opposed to to over skype, which we do sometimes. Uh, is there anything else that you’d like to tell a patient? Maybe they’re interested in contact lenses. Anything else that you’d like them to think about that, that maybe they hadn’t thought about before?

Dr. Benoit: 11:51 Well, I think that anyone that’s listening to this podcast, if you haven’t thought about contact lenses, maybe you should. Contact Lenses can work for pretty much anyone as long as you’ve got motivation to where the contact lens and certainly here at a bright eyes, you will get to some of the best care that you will get anywhere.

Dr. Nate: 12:11 Well, thank you for that Dr. Benoit. So to all of our listeners, thank you for listening. If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions, you can email us at office@brighteyestampa.com. Until next time, we’ll all be at the beach,

Exit: 12:30 Brought to you by Bright Eyes Family Vision Care and Bright Eyes Kids. Find previous episodes and more detailed information at brighteyestampa.com, creative Commons, copyright attribution, non-commercial use. The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis treatment.

 

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Air Optix Colors Contact Lenses Are Here!

AO_home_img2_770x549I will be honest. I have actively discouraged patients from using cosmetic contact lenses. I have done it for years. Not because I have anything against colored lenses, but because the most common lens, Freshlook, was uncomfortable and not as healthy as new lenses i prescribe.

People are familiar with the Freshlook brand of colored lenses, because it’s been around for 18 years! And until now, Freshlook was the leading brands for colored contacts. So some people feel if something works, why bother change? And for 18 years, Freshlook must have been doing something right, right? Well, who can imagine using a cell phone that was made 18 years ago? It is a ridiculous thought. Continue reading

New Water-Gradient Contact Lenses – Alcon’s Dailies Total 1 Available at Bright Eyes!

dailies total1 (640x419)

Bright Eyes is excited about the newest daily contact lens: Dailies Total 1! Manufactured by Ciba Vision, this new lens is the first to supply the perfect balance between hydration and comfort for daily contact lenses.

Sometimes people find a lens that’s comfortable, but they still experience occasional discomfort during the day. Then, they continue to hear about the newest lens that is the most comfortable and “breathable”one out there. The difference with Dailies Total 1 is the increase in the amount of water-permeability throughout the lens. Unlike the other Silicone Hydrogel lenses, Dailies Total 1 lenses still includes great breathe-ability for the lens, but adds more “wettability” for comfort: > 80% water-content.

At Bright Eyes, we love new technology and we are proud that among the first optometry practices in the nation to offer this premium contact lens. I am very excited to offer it to people who have issues with dryness and discomfort with their normal contact lenses. I personally have dry eyes and I can only tolerate most contact lenses for 3 to 4 hours. I always like to try products before offering them to patients and with Dailies Total 1 I am able to wear them all day. My staff have have also tried these lenses, and find this lens to be the top-class for comfort.

Here is a short video about how comfortable these lenses are:

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You can also learn more about Dailies Total 1 by visiting: http://www.dailies.com/products/dailies-total-one.shtml.

Stop by or call us to make an appointment to try theses super comfortable contacts!

 

Dr. Nate

By Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care

 

Want to Wear Contacts? Take the Acuvue 1-Day Moist Contact Lens Challenge!

1DayEvent

Have you always wanted to wear contacts, but never asked your eye doctor if you could? Do your glasses get in the way during sports or other hobbies? Or maybe you already use contacts, but you just find them irritating or inconvenient?

Well, we have the event for you! The Bright Eyes Acuvue 1-Day Contact Lens Challenge! Here is how it works:

Every participant in the 1- day Challenge will receive:

A contact lens exam Healthy, comfortable, clear vision is always our top priority. We want to make sure these contacts are right for you and will work well.
Trial contacts to last for 1 week – We want you to really see the benefits of 1-Day lenses, not only in the office, but it your everyday life. So we give you lenses to use for the week. No contact lens solution needed!
Contact lens training – If you haven’t worn contacts before, we will teach you how to put them in and take them out safely. Of course, there is no care needed – simply throw them away at night.
A 30-Day supply of Acuvue 1-Day Moist contacts After you come back for your follow up appointment, and we agree that everything is awesome, you will receive your 30 supply of contact lenses.
$50 discount towards sunglasses – Acuvue 1 Day Moist contacts have UV protection to help protect your eyes from the sun, but you should still use UV blocking sunglasses to protect the areas around your eyes, which is why we are giving you $50 towards any sunglasses we carry!

All of this for only $100! But only for the month of June!

Why Acuvue 1 Day Moist? Simply put, they are super healthy and convenient. Not only are they incredibly comfortable, but they eliminate the problems from allergies and deposits. Best of all, you do not have to buy and use contact lens cleaning solution, which can bother certain people!

Want to learn more about Johnson & Johnson Acuvue 1-Day Moist Contact Lenses? Visit their website. You can also watch the fun video below to get an idea of how great 1-Day contacts are!

Ready to get started in your new contact lenses? Just call 813-792-0637, or request an appointment online.

 

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Biofinity Blowout Bonanza!

contact biofinity

UPDATE: We are extending this to the entire week of June 6 – 10th!

Do you wear Biofinity/Aquaclear brand contact lenses from Cooper Vision? If so, today’s your lucky day! Here at Bright Eyes, we’re having the biggest contact lens sale ever!! For today only, if you bring in your valid contact lens prescription for Biofinity/Aquaclear lenses or have a prescription on file here, you can save $100 on an annual supply. That’s a total of 4 boxes for just $130 plus a $30 mail-in manufacturer rebate. So if you’re running low on contacts or have just put off purchasing them, make sure and come in between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. today for some awesome savings!!

And don’t forget about our Ugly Glasses Contest!! Go to our Facebook page or click on the link to enter. You only have 3 days left to submit that hideous picture of you wearing the ugliest glasses you’ve owned. You could win a new pair of designer glasses valued at up to $500 to start your summer in style!

Justin Schoonover, CPO
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
Located in the Westchase area of Tampa.

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Circle Lens Statement by the American Optometric Association

Although anime or “Circle Lenses” have been around for a while, thanks to Lady Gaga they are surging in popularity right now. But remember that only FDA approved contact lenses prescribed by an eye doctor are considered safe to wear. By law, lenses cannot be sold without a valid contact lens prescription.

If you have any questions about the safety of your lenses, please contact us.

Dr. Nate

Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
Located in the Westchase area of Tampa.

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The American Optometric Association (AOA) Statement Regarding Circle Contact Lenses

Patient safety and access to adequate eye care is always our concern. With the growing interest in “circle lenses,” colored plano and prescription contact lenses imported primarily from Asia, the AOA is once again working to inform consumers of the risk of these illegal lenses. And, last month, AOA staff led one of the largest meetings of federal officials concerned about the illegal sale of these and other decorative contact lenses, convened by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

“With the FDA’s focus of ‘Protecting and Promoting Health,’ the recent gathering served as an outstanding platform to brainstorm with FDA officials,” states Joe E. Ellis, O.D. President of the American Optometric Association. “We found that FDA officials were shocked, as well as dismayed, by how easy these lenses can be obtained, and how aggressively adolescents and young adults are targeted.”

The AOA is responding to numerous requests for information and interviews from media outlets across the country. “We are working with the consumer media to encourage people to visit an eye care professional and get a proper prescription. A beauty fad is not worth causing problems with your sight,” adds Dr. Ellis.

Consumers should not use any contact lenses, whether they are circle lenses, or otherwise, without a proper examination and prescription by an eye care professional. Risks associated with the improper use of decorative contact lenses include conjunctivitis, corneal swelling, eye infection, allergic reaction and corneal abrasion due to poor lens fit and/or improper lens care. Additional problems may result in a reduction of visual acuity, diminished contrast sensitivity, or reduced peripheral vision and other general eye and vision impairments. Optometrists are encouraged to report any violations of the sale of contact lenses, or any adverse health consequences, to AOA’s Washington office.

CooperVision Gear Up Grants

At Bright Eyes, we try to stay current in the opportunities given to our patients. As contact lens companies go, it’s usually in the form of rebates and annual supply savings. Recently however, one company has gone above and beyond the product savings to offer an opportunity in an activity many of us and our kids participate in but usually don’t associate with wearing contacts: athletics. Contact lenses are a necessary piece of “equipment” in many athletes’ gear bags. Because glasses are cumbersome and can even be dangerous in certain sports, contacts are a comfortable and healthy alternative that give athletes a crisp and complete field of vision.

CooperVision, a company that manufactures, among others, the Proclear, Biofinity, Biomedics, and Frequency line of contacts, is holding a contest in which it will award ten prizes of $2,500 to athletic teams, athletes, or even community sporting organizations. They want to make sure teams and individuals have the proper “gear” to help them compete. Plus any member of the team who currently wears contacts or glasses will also have the chance to be fitted with CooperVision contact lenses for an entire year.

To enter you must complete the online form and create a short video or series of photos introducing your team and why you think you should win. What could you use the grant for? Whatever you think your team needs to succeed: new jerseys or uniforms, new equipment, transportation funds to your next away game. You must hurry though, because the deadline to submit is June 25th.

Visit the link below for additional information and to submit your video and application.

http://www.mycontactsports.com/

All the best,

Justin Schoonover

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