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Bright Eyes Kids in Westchase Fl

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2019 Buddy Walk

Dr. Nate’s Note: We at Bright Eyes enjoy being involved in the community and love to support our patients. This year we were lucky enough to attend the 2019 Buddy Walk at Raymond James Stadium to raise money for F.R.I.E.N.D.S. Down Syndrome West Florida.

Esther Rodas, a member of out optical sales team reflects on her experience.

My experience at the Tampa 2019 Buddy Walk was nothing short of wonderful. Being a part of and witnessing all of the support given to the Down Syndrome community and their loved ones was really heartwarming and awesome to see!

This was my first year attending. The event consisted of wide spectrum of different vendors from our optometric practice to occupational therapy practices, dancing organizations, chiropractic services, employment networking, disability resources, sports groups, mary kay and many many more. There were several activities to raise money such as raffles, snacks/food for sale and donations of course. The top team fundraising ranking came in at: $6,005, while the top individual ranking came in at $320! Again, a lot of support was given and it was great to see. Aside from the supporting vendors and sponsors there was also fantastic entertainment such as dance themes that performed and an amazing performance of our national anthem. There was also an animal petting area for the kids and for animal loving adults as well.

Our practice presented various lines of kids frames that we carry at our clinic. Frames that are incredibly durable for kids, sports goggles, and lines designed specifically for those with special needs. We passed out coupons to use at our practice for those interested in stopping by that may be in need of glasses for their kiddos. We engaged with the various families present, some of which have been Bright Eyes patients for many years. It was a wonderful opportunity and pleasure for us to be able to present to the families present what we have to offer that can help their kids or themselves for that matter!

The day ended with the buddy walk in which we cheered on the families and teams that walked together. We took beautiful pictures of the groups walking together and being cheered on by us all. It was the perfect ending to a great day. I look forward to my future attendance in the buddy walk and certainly look forward to contributing in any way that I can along with my Bright Eyes team.

 

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Join us for the Westchase Location Grand Opening – September 10th!

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Any of the patients that have been to Bright Eyes Family in Westchase have seen the new office. We are so excited that the construction is (finally!) done, the dust has settled and we are ready to celebrate our expansion!

You will notice that we have more than doubled our square footage to serve you better! This includes more exam rooms and more vision therapy and myopia control space, and ability to make glasses right in the office.

We are so lucky to have such supportive family, friends and patients, as well as an amazing staff! We hope you can join us!

– Dr. Nate & Cristina Bonilla-Warford & the Bright Eyes team

Details:

Event: Westchase Grand Opening

Date: Tuesday, September 10

Time: 4:30-7:00pm

Location: 9912 W. Linebaugh Ave, Tampa, FL 33626

Entertainment: Live Music, Refreshments, and “Behind the Scenes” tours.

Children and Families welcome!

RSVP to Bright Eyes with your name & number of guests:813-792-0637 or office@brighteyestampa.com

 

 

Podcast Episode #15: Myopia Management With Esther Rodas

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

In this episode, Dr. Nate talks with Optician Esther Rodas about Myopia and the treatment options to control it.

You can listen in the player below or read the transcript. The show is available via Stitcher, Google Play, iTunes, and the webplayer below. You can find all previous episodes here. If you have any questions or suggestions for future episodes, please email office@BrightEyesTampa.com.

Previous relevant episodes:


Full Transcript:

Introduction [00:00:10] Welcome to the Bright Eyes podcast. Advice for healthy vision for all ages. Your hosts are doctor Nate Bonilla-Warford and Dr. Beth Knighton. Residency trained optometrist providing eye care to all ages with exams for glasses and contacts and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, Ortho-kertology and sports vision training. Their mission is to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional and individualized eyecare.

Dr. Nate [00:00:38] From rainy Tampa Bay. It’s the Bright Eyes podcast.This is episode number 15. I’m Dr. Nate Bonilla-Waford and today’s episode is all about myopia control. I’d like to introduce our special guest today this is Esther Rodas. Esther is an Optician. She works here at Bright Eyes and not only is she an optician, she’s our myopia control coordinator so Hi Esther.

Esther [00:01:05] Hello everyone. So Esther here just like Dr. Nate just mentioned and been here for about a couple of years and usually I will be the one that you talk to if you have any questions on myopia control and scheduling and all of that good stuff.

Dr. Nate [00:01:21] Absolutely. And when Esther joined us she was a student at the Hillsborough Community College in the opticianry program. And now that she’s got her license she works with us full time and we are so lucky to have her and patients just love her and all the staff does too.

Esther [00:01:37] Happy to be here.

Dr. Nate [00:01:38] Excellent. So Esther we introduced myopia in episode six as part of our refractive error episode. And here’s our vision therapist Miriam giving the definition of myopia.

Miriam [00:01:56] Myopia, aka nearsightedness is a condition where objects up close appear clearly while objects far away appear blurry. With myopia, light comes to focus in front of the retina instead of on the retina.

Dr. Nate [00:02:10] So myopia is all about nearsightedness. It’s all about not being able to see very far away without either contacts or glasses or lenses of some sort or for adults they can consider refractive surgery like LASIK. From your perspective Esther when a doctor diagnoses a child with myopia what are some of the most common questions that parents will ask you?

Esther [00:02:36] Definitely first thing they ask is if it’s permanent. If it’ll get better the older that they get?

Dr. Nate [00:02:43] Right. And that’s one of the questions that they ask us doctors are very first thing. They’re like, are they going to outgrow this? Are these glasses that they need? Or is this something that after a while they won’t need anymore? And one of the things about myopia that’s important to understand is while we see it as vision getting blurrier or glasses getting thicker or stronger, what’s really happening in myopia is the eye ball itself is stretching, it’s getting longer and getting bigger and it’s much easier for the eye tissue to stretch and elongate rather than it is to shrink and get smaller. And so for that reason when we’re talking about myopia I like to say it’s a one way street but it doesn’t really get better. And so after they kind of digest that what are the next questions that parents will ask you?

Esther [00:03:40] So once they know what can potentially happen and the inside of the eye they definitely know the options at that point what they can do to limit that progression.

Dr. Nate [00:03:51] Right. And so when I talked to parents, we always talk about myopia as a condition that needs to be managed. It’s not just in one point in time it’s a lifetime of change that we need to think about. We always talk about myopia in the short term and in the long term. So in the short term, kids need to be able to see, they need to be able to see the board at school, they need to be able to see for sports they need to be able to function in everyday life. There’s a variety of different ways that we can help them be able to see clearly and that’s the common things that people are familiar with glasses, contacts, the night time treatment contacts of ortho-K can help people see clearly. So there’s different options and we need to address that first because it’s very important that we make sure that kids have useful vision for living their lives. But, we also need to make sure that we are addressing the long term component. Because myopia tends to worsen and sometimes more dramatically in some patients rather than others- we need to make sure we’re addressing that and offering different kinds of treatments to hopefully reduce the risk of progression. So in our office Esther, what are the three main ways that we use to reduce the progression of myopia?

Esther [00:05:26] We offer here the Atropine medicated eyedrops as one solution. We offer Ortho-keratology which is the night time lenses and we also offer specialty designs soft multi-focal lenses to help with that progression.

Dr. Nate [00:05:46] Right. And we feel very strongly not just with myopia but with all of our patient care that every option needs to be tailored individually to the patient. So it’s not one size fits all. It’s not that every single patient who comes in needs any one particular treatment but it depends on their lifestyle,it depends on their goals,it depends on their genetics,it depends on if they’re more likely to progress. So very briefly we’ll just go over what these options are. The first one which is the most easy to administer are the Atropine eye drops. Now, atropine is a medication that dilate the pupils and it reduces the eyes ability to focus. And for that reason, it hasn’t been widely used in the United States. It’s used for many many conditions but not for myopia control. Until recently when it was discovered that you could use a very low concentration to minimize the side effects. So we have many patients who are on the low concentration atropine treatment to reduce the likelihood of progression. We don’t know exactly how the atropine works, what it’s doing in the eyes but it’s been shown in many many many studies to be effective. So that’s that’s one option. The other option like Esther said was the multifocal contacts.The multi-focal contacts are worn in the daytime just like any other soft contact that you’d be familiar with. But it has a special optical treatment which provides some stimulus to the eye that reduces its need or its inclination to to get worse. We can optically change how the light focus is on the back of the eye to reduce that stimulus to progress and get worse. And so that’s the daytime contacts. The nighttime contacts the Ortho-K does the same thing optically, but it actually reshapes the eyes so that you can see clearly without daytime contacts or glasses. So you get a little bit of a two for one with ortho-K which is great. So once we do the exam and we take lifestyle into account, we look at all of the the treatment options and I will recommend a particular treatment option for a patient. I’ll bring them out and then they will go over the details and the logistics of that treatment option with Esther at that point. What kind of questions do you get?

Esther [00:08:24] So definitely the top question which you kind of touched on right now is their parents are only super interested and intrigued of like the science behind each one and the how is it that the atropine, the multi focal and that the nighttime lends aid in hopefully limiting that progression of the nearsightedness for their child. So anything you can add to what you just said.

Dr. Nate [00:08:48] So the interesting thing about myopia control is even though there are many many scientific papers exploring how well these different options work and how they relate to each other- we don’t thoroughly understand exactly how they work. We have a pretty good idea of how the optical effects of the multi focal contacts on the ortho-K works to reduce that stimulus to progress. We really don’t know as much about how the atropine works. We know that atropine has been used for hundreds and hundreds of years and it’s been used for many many conditions and it’s extremely safe to use. We don’t know what’s exactly going on at the molecular level to help keep the eyes from progressing, but we do know it’s very effective. I know the parents don’t think that that’s a super satisfying answer but it is the honest answer at this point. So what other questions do parents ask you?

Esther [00:09:45] Definitely risks. They want to know what kind of risks are involved and short term risks and long term risk as well. So for example the night time contacts as they are more rigid than the soft lenses. And they always want to know what the risks are for abrasions and things like that. Almost the same for soft contact lenses for short term risks. Long time parents want to know if the ridgid of lenses will affect the kids eligibility to do maybe LASIK in the future. Parents also ask about any effects that that may have on things such as glaucoma and any long term risks in the medicated eye drops. So it’s kind of like a few questions and one.

Dr. Nate [00:10:34] Well I think that that’s really important topic because with any procedure or with any therapy we always need to weigh the benefits and the risks and that’s part of the discussion that always happens between me and the parents when we’re talking about undertaking one of these treatments. Fortunately in the big picture all of these have been proven to be very safe. And that’s why we can feel comfortable doing them. And that’s why I feel comfortable with both of my children using these different methods. My son uses the medicated eyedrops. And my daughter does the night time Ortho-K lenses. Obviously, if I didn’t feel they were very safe I’d be reluctant to use them with my own kids and I know that lots of doctors around the country and around the world have their own children and in myopia control programs similar to these as well. So let’s talk about the different risks with any contacts. There are certainly risks especially if you don’t use proper hygiene, if you don’t care for them properly. If you use them in a way that you shouldn’t be then you increase those risks. Fortunately all of the scientific studies that have shown that with the Ortho-k lenses for night time don’t have any additional risk compared to traditional contact lens wear. And so that that helps us educate patients properly now. The very first question that people ask me is often, well I was told that I shouldn’t sleep in my contacts because it’s not healthy. So why is it healthy to sleep in these contacts. That’s a great question because it’s true that you shouldn’t sleep in your daytime contacts because one- they’re often not intended for that two- if you’re sleeping in them in the nighttime and then wearing them in the daytime then you’re wearing them for a full 24 or multiple cycles. And that can create problems because the lenses never get cleaned with Ortho-k. One, they are super breathable materials. Two, they’re designed specifically to be worn at night and three they’re only worn for about eight hours at night and then they’re being cleaned and stored the rest of the time. Furthermore the Ortho-k lenses rarely or never leave the house. It’s not like the contact lenses that you wear where you get pollen in them you, get dust in them. If you are out and about your eyes can get sweaty you can get sunblock on them if they goes in your eyes etc. Whereas Ortho-k you put them in before you go to bed you take them out in the morning and they’re clean and so the lenses stay very, very clean and we’re very, very clear about the proper method for keeping the lenses clean. Once we have the proper care method established then the risks go way,way down. It is possible in the short term, if the patient doesn’t have good insertion technique for putting the lenses in to lightly scratch or abrade their eye but that’s very, very rare and when it does happen it’s mild and it resolves right away. Now fortunately, we’ve never had any infection for any of our patients and that is incredibly rare with proper care. That’s the same for our for our soft contact lens patients soft contact lenses are healthier than ever before and the risk of infection is is very, very low. I will add here and I always tell patients all the time, that you should never use tap water or you should never clean your lenses with anything other than solutions that have been provided. You shouldn’t shower or swim or go on lakes or hot tubs with your contact lenses on because that can introduce contaminants or bacteria or amoebas that can cause a severe infection. So I was always educating about that.

Dr. Nate [00:14:48] Regarding the atropine, there are known side effects like I mentioned about sensitivity to light and focusing, but by using the lower concentration those are dramatically reduced. Other than that, the only real side effect that can happen with patients sometimes is if the drops come with a certain preservative and the patients are sensitive to that preservative it can cause an allergic like reaction where the eyes get red and irritated. Many of our patients use non preserved drops and that’s not an issue we haven’t found that to be a common problem. But it’s theoretically possible and some patients you it’s hard to know whether they’re they respond to preservatives or not. In the long term, for long term use- atropine has been used for for many years without any problems or side effects.

Esther [00:15:49] We do go through a couple of compounding pharmacies.

Dr. Nate [00:15:53] Yeah, we do have some options and that’s actually an important point. So if you get the high concentration atropine which we don’t use very often except in the very most stubbornly progressive cases, you can get that at almost any pharmacy because that’s the standard formulation that is used to treat eye disease. The lower concentration is only available through compounding pharmacies and we have a variety of options that we can we can help patients acquire that.

Esther [00:16:25] Have you got at all questions about if it’ll affect someone’s eligibility for LASIK in their future or the glaucoma?

Dr. Nate [00:16:33] Yeah and that’s actually a very common question and it’s a great question because sometimes patients are concerned well maybe this reshaping with Ortho-k reshaping of the cornea will adversely affect them for their chances for Lasik and I say you know exactly the opposite. The goal of Ortho-k is to keep the eyes the prescription is stable enough over the long term so that they remain eligible for for LASIK or refractive surgery. What typically happens is people will do Ortho-k starting when they’re when they’re younger maybe you know 10 or 12 years old and they’ll keep doing it until they’re an adult they might stop at 18 or I had a patient just the other day was 12 and she’s now 30 and she’s been doing it continuously. But if she or other patients wanted to stop as an adult they could wait until their eyes go back to their natural shape and once that’s stable and it’s confirmed to be stable with repeated curvature measurements then they are eligible for LASIK just like any other patient will be.

Esther [00:17:44] How about the glaucoma question?

Dr. Nate [00:17:47] So the glaucoma question is interesting because people worry about glaucoma for this reason- they think the Ortho-k lenses press on the eye to reshape the lenses. And if they’re pressing on the eye then that’s going to increase the pressure inside the eye and if you increase the pressure inside the eye that’s going to increase the risk of optic nerve damage called glaucoma. Now the reason why it is not a risk for glaucoma is because Ortho-k lenses don’t actually work by pressing on the eye what they do is they they are kind of a rigid surface that goes over the cornea and then over time the cornea conforms to that lens it- actually kind of expands outwards to meet the shape of the lens so instead of pressing on the eye, the cornea actually reshapes itself or expands to meet the lens. So there’s no reason to think that the pressure inside the eyes increases when we do Ortho-k and therefore there’s no added risk for it for glaucoma. Again kind of like LASIK, nearsightedness itself is a risk factor for glaucoma if you have very high myopia in nearsightedness you have increased risk for for glaucoma. So it may be that doing Ortho-k might actually help reduce the risk long term of glaucoma.

Esther [00:19:25] That’s great information. Thank you. I would say those are the top questions and the last question that I always get at the very end is if these methods are FDA approved?

Dr. Nate [00:19:38] Right. And so here’s the thing about FDA approval all of these methods are FDA approved for a variety of conditions and treatments but not specifically for reducing the progression of myopia. So we’re very clear when we talk to parents and we have it in writing and we explain that while all of these treatments are scientifically valid and there is many studies that talk about the the benefits that the FDA itself has not gotten around to evaluating yet and stating that these methods are specifically approved for the reduction in the progression of nearsightedness. Many other countries have, and there’s lots of scientific evidence to show that it is, but no the FDA hasn’t. Now, all of these things like the atropine eyedrops are approved for treating many, many kinds of conditions including Amblyopia,which is something that we see in the office a lot. A multi-focal contacts are certainly approved for lots of conditions. Specifically, presbyopia for older adults who need to see up close. Ortho-k, the nighttime contacts is approved for treatment of nearsightedness so that people can see clearly throughout the day, but they haven’t gone that extra step yet in approving it specifically for the reduction in the risk of progression. So that’s something that we think it’s important that people understand it doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t do it, but it is in the state of approval right now.

Dr. Nate [00:21:29] Well, hopefully this has been helpful for people who are interested in learning more about myopia control in the future we hope to have some more episodes detailing how each of these methods work. I think it would be kind of fun to have my kids on and they can talk about their experience. That would be that would be interesting to hear it from their own mouth. And we have lots of other topics in mind if you have any suggestions I have topics that you’d like to hear in the future, please let us know. I’d like to thank Esther for joining us and talking to us today. And is there anything else you wanna say before we go now?

Esther [00:22:16] Thanks for having me and to all those listening to this podcast. If there’s any questions if you want to schedule a myopia consultation with Dr. Nate just ask for myself Esther and be more than happy to answer any questions that I can and get you on our schedule right.

Dr. Nate [00:22:34] And if you want to you can call us at 1-813-792-0637. Or you can e-mail the office at office@BrightEyesTampa.com. Until next time,stay dry.

Outro: [00:22:46] Brought to you by Bright Eyes family vision care and Bright Eyes Kids. Find previous episodes and more detailed information at BrightEyesTampa.com. Creative Commons copyright attribution noncommercial use. The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. There’s no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute a medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis treatment.

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

The New Bright Eyes Family Vision Care in Westchase!

As any patient who has visited us at Bright Eyes Family Vision Care in Westchase recently is aware, things are changing! After months of signs, noise, dust, and a little disorientation, our expansion from our previous 1,600 square feet location with the darker design has been transformed into almost 4,000 square feet with an update, lighter, fresher look!

You can see a few photos of the entrance and reception area, a new, expanded waiting area for adults and children, and a larger more conveniently designed optical areas with a kid’s area and more patient care desks and computers. What is not shown here is the increased numbers of patient care rooms for exams, testing, and vision therapy, as well as administrative rooms. Also, the walls a re still a little bare. We have an entire room of artwork and displays that need to go up.

But most importantly, the larger office means that it is easier than ever to schedule an appointment. You can request an appointment here or call. (813)792-063.

Stay tuned for an open house announcement.

Cheers!

-Dr. Nate

 

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Bright Eyes is Getting Bigger!

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Hi, it is Dr. Nate with good news!

As longtime patients know, Bright Eyes Family Vision Care was started in a very small location. Located in the West Park Village in the Westchase neighborhood of Tampa, we occupied the space on Montague street where the Coldwell Banker is now. In 2006 we were only open part-time and with less than a thousand square feet. There was one exam room, one vision therapy room, and no separate doctor’s office or designated areas for diagnostic testing or contact lens training.

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Bright Eye Grand Opening in 2006

Our office grew quickly and soon with myself and four employees, we barely had room for patients! So we moved to the Linebaugh Ave location next to Sylvan Learning Center where we are now. With more space, we hired more staff and continued to grow. But we discovered that patients who came to see us from farther away to the north and east, such as Gainesville and Lakeland had a hard time getting through Tampa traffic. So we opened Bright Eyes Kids in New Tampa in 2014. We have continued to grow. We are up to almost 20 employees!

Now it is 2018 and we want to add more eye care staff, but we have no place to put them! Staff members are already coming to blows over seats and computers! OK, not really, but it is crowded. What a problem to have! As it turns out, the Sylvan Learning Center has moved to a different location and since the vacant location is next door to us, we are taking it over. The new combined spaces will be almost three times as large as the current space. We will have more exam rooms, more vision therapy rooms, a larger optical, a conference room, a larger waiting area with a separate kids area, and even more features. It will also mean hiring more excellent staff!

We will begin by remodeling the Sylvan location and then we will update the current Bright Eyes location. Yes, there will be a “Please pardon our dust, while we make improvements to serve you better” sign up. But we WILL remain open during the construction. To be clear – Bright Eyes is not moving, just expanding. The address, phone number, and everything will stay the same. We are VERY excited about this project. It will allow us to make many improvements such as shorter waiting times for appointments and for glasses. The expansion should be complete very early in 2019.

Myself, Cristina, Dr. Beth and the rest of the Bright Eyes Team are so very thankful that our patients trust us with the care of themselves and their family. It means a great deal to us that we can continue to do what we love even better in 2019! If you have questions, suggestions, or recommendations about the expansion, send them to me at Doc@BrightEyesTampa.com or leave them in the comments.

Thank you!

-Dr. Nate

Spring Cleaning Sale – All Frames on Sale

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Here at Bright Eyes Family Vision Care we have to get ready for SUMMER. And one of the things that means for us is making room for the newest styles of frames. So we hare having a

Spring Cleaning Frame Sale!

A few things to know:

  • Friday, May 18th, 2018.
  • All frames are on sale, up to 50% on some frames.
  • This is ONLY at Bright Eyes in Westchase (Bright Eyes Kids is not open on Fridays).
  • Special Europa and db4K trunk show for kids and adults from 2pm to 6pm only.

About Europa:

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A simple business philosophy of providing customers with quality products, fair prices, and unbeatable service has propelled Europa’s ongoing success. Today, Europa has expanded that original philosophy to include a customer driven approach which focuses on satisfying the needs of every optical retailer. From designer eyewear and sunwear, to a collection designed for managed care concerns, Europa has the product, programs and desire to meet the challenges required of a valued vendor.

Featuring, Scott Harris, this diverse collection features both traditional, unisex styling and the ultimate in high fashion designs for those seeking a unique look. All Scott Harris models are constructed from the finest components available, including spring hinges from Germany and Japan, and a wide array of base metals from Japan.

db4k Logo copyAbout db4k:

Children are amazing. Everyday these fearless kids are learning, trying, doing something that they have never before known, tried, done. db4k wants to ensure that they are seeing this wondrous world as clearly they can. Created to be a reflection of a child’s taste and personality, this collection was designed to grow with them and their ever-changing interests. It’s a collection that appeals to kids and parents alike. These are the glasses that you wish you had when you were a kid.

Now, we know that all the trendy shapes, vivid colors, and fun, graphic embellishments are not enough. db4k boasts offers all the latest technology including lightweight materials, spring hinges, adjustable nosepads, and soft, flexible cable temples to provide comfortable, all-day wear. Because no matter how awesome the glasses look, children won’t wear them if they hurt.

Podcast Episode #2: What is an Optometrist? (The 5 O’s)

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

For episode #2 of the Bright Eyes Podcast, Dr. Nate and Dr. Beth discuss the differences and similarities between the 5 O’s:

  • Optometrists
  • Ophthalmologists
  • Opticians
  • Orthoptists
  • Ocularists


Transcript:

Dr. Beth: [00:00:03] From rainy Tampa Bay it’s the Bright Eyes podcast. This is episode number two. I’m Dr. Beth Knighton.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:10] And I am Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford.

Dr. Beth: [00:00:13] And today’s episode is all about what is an optometrist.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:18] That’s right. But first Beth I need to acknowledge the elephant in the room and that is it really does not sound like we’re recording this in a professional recording studio in New York with hundreds of thousands of dollars of equipment. You know why that is?

Dr. Beth: [00:00:36] Because we’re in our office on the laptop.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:41] It’s true we’ve got our Blue Yeti microphone and our laptop in the blue exam room in Bright Eyes Family Vision Care and it doesn’t sound perfect but it sounds OK. And hopefully over time as we do more of these we will make it sound a little bit better. I was too impatient to get started with the podcast. So here we are.

staffDr. Beth: [00:01:13] So I get asked a lot about what the difference is between an optometrist and an ophthalmologist. And the main difference between the two is surgical treatment. So optometrists and ophthalmologists are trained in eye disease and how the eye works. But we take it from slightly different perspectives, so an optometrist will look more at the functional aspects of eyes and vision how they work as a team versus a ophthalmologist who will look at it from an eye disease standpoint deciding if surgery or laser treatment or other options are needed. And so we both are critical to the eye care world without one or the other. It would really be difficult for our patients. And so the better that we can work as a team and be on board together for our patients it provides better outcomes for everybody.

Dr. Nate: [00:02:24] Yeah I agree with that. I think that as a general rule optometrists tend to think more about vision and vision development as people grow from being infants to toddlers to kids to teenagers to adults how their vision changes and what their visual needs are. I think the ophthalmologists that I know some of my friends who are ophthalmologists they tend to think more about how the eyes grow and how the eyes age and what kind of diseases the eyeballs themselves can get. And that would include everything from cataracts and glaucoma and diseases related to diabetes. And any of those things. And like Dr. Beth said both are extremely important but they do have slightly different perspectives.

Dr. Beth: [00:03:24] The training for the two is similar but different. And that optometrists and ophthalmologists go for their undergraduate degree, four years of that then optometrists go on to optometry school for four years. And of the optometrists who graduate some of them choose to go on for residency for further training. Like Dr. Nate and I did in pediatrics specifically, but there are lots of specialties that optometrists can go into. And ophthalmologist when they leave under-graduate go on to four years of medical school where they learn eyes and body and then go on to do a three to five year residency in ophthalmology or their specialty and potentially onto fellowship after that for further training. So that’s the difference between an optometrist and an ophthalmologist. But then there’s also an optician. And so Nate you want to tell us a little bit about that.

Dr. Nate: [00:04:29] So before I went to optometry school my wife Cristina was getting her masters at the University of Wisconsin – Madison I was an optician. An optician is somebody who is specially trained in the fitting and fabrication and fixing and dispensing of glasses. And in some states those are licensed in Florida you can get an optician license but you don’t have to have one. In some states they’re not licensed. So I had the experience of being an optician and working with glasses and one of my favorite things about being an optician was repairing glasses when they appeared to be hopelessly damaged. Sometimes you have to be very creative to fix glasses so that people can use them until they’re able to purchase a new pair.

Dr. Beth: [00:05:33] We’ve seen some come into the office that have been pretty mangled at that time. It’s true. So what about orthoptists? Some people have heard of that. How does that fit in?

Dr. Nate: [00:05:46] So an orthoptist is a form of vision therapist that works with ophthalmologists. I’ve known a few orthoptists. Unfortunately they are kind of a vanishing breed. They used to be much more common when ophthalmologists provided more visual training or vision therapy to help improve the functional vision of patients. They don’t tend to do that as much. And so they don’t have the orthtopists to help them develop the skills for patients but they are very dedicated and knowledgeable people they know a whole lot about the eyes and how they move and focus and coordinate vision.

Dr. Nate: [00:06:37] And then there’s one more and that is an ocularist. And an ocularist makes prosthetic eyes. Or sometimes people call them up Glass-Eye even though they’re not glass but they are fake. I have somebody either didn’t develop an eye properly or they lost it due to trauma or some sort of injury. Yes they are extremely talented artists that make prosthetic that’s comfortable for patients and it’s hand-painted to match the other eye as closely as possible. I always think that that’s fascinating work.

Dr. Nate: [00:07:19] There are some really great videos and some of these topics. There is a wonderful video that says “I am a Doctor of Optometry” (below) and we’ll put that in the show notes. There’s another video about what an optometrist is and there’s some ones about opticians and ocularists. So all of those.

Dr. Beth: [00:07:43] Thank you all for listening. If you have any questions comments or suggestions you can e-mail us at office@BrightEyesTampa.com. Until next time stay dry.

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Thank you for listening. If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, you can email us at office@brighteyestampa.com.

The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro/outro music by Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Podcast Episode #1 – Who We Are

Note: This is the first episode of our new podcast that will cover all aspects of vision care. You can listen in the player below or read the transcript. The show is available via Stitcher, Google Play, iTunes, and the webplayer below. You can find all episodes here. If you have any suggestions for future episodes, please email office@BrightEyesTampa.com.

-Dr. Nate

Episode 1 transcript:

Dr. Nate: [00:00:00] From sunny Tampa Bay is the Bright Eyes podcast. This is episode number one. I’m Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford.

Dr. Beth: [00:00:09] And I am Dr. Beth Knighton.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:11] And today’s episode is all about us. In the future, we’re going to talk about different aspects of eyes and vision care and different things that you can do to take care of your eyes and improve your vision. But for today since this is our very first podcast episode we’re going to introduce you a little bit about us our practice and how we do things. So how are you feeling, Beth?

Dr. Beth: [00:00:39] I’m feeling great.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:41] Are you excited?Warford 2597 color 239x300

Dr. Beth: [00:00:42] Yes.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:42] Are you excited to be doing podcasts?

Dr. Beth: [00:00:44] Yeah. 🙂

Dr. Nate: [00:00:46] So first off, I have lots of experience in podcasting. My first podcast was in 2010 to 2013. I also do another podcast with an ophthalmologist which we do every month and I think it is a wonderful medium to share information. I’m an avid podcast listener. I listen to podcasts literally every day. So I think it’s fantastic and I’m excited to do it. What about your experience?

Dr. Beth: [00:01:19] Yes I am excited to do this new adventure here learning about podcasts and getting our information out there to everybody.

Dr. Nate: [00:01:29] Great. So a little bit about me. I grew up in north central Florida and I went to University of Florida. I got my Optometry degree at the Illinois College of Optometry in Chicago. I did my residency in Pediatric Vision and Vision Therapy also at ICO and then we moved back to Florida and we opened Bright Eyes Family Vision Care here in Westchase in 2006. We’ve been working here for the last 11 years. I say we because my wife Cristina is the office manager and we’ve grown from a tiny office with just a handful of staff to two offices with about 16 staff members.Dr EK Pic 224x300

Dr. Beth: [00:02:16] I grew up in Clearwater, Florida. I went to the University of South Florida in Tampa for my undergraduate degree and then I also went to the Illinois College of Optometry in Chicago like Dr. Nate and went on to do my Pediatric Residency at the University of Houston in Texas and I stayed on there teaching for a little while. But Florida is my home and I was able to come back this way. So now back in the Tampa Bay area I reached out to Dr. Nate. And at that time he was looking to expand to create the second office which is Bright Eyes Kids and so I was able to join the Bright Eyes family in 2014 and started out part time and grew as the practice did. And now here at the Bright Eyes Westchase office and the Bright Eyes Kids office full time with Dr. Nate

Dr. Nate: [00:03:17] Yes. And it is fantastic. I love having a doctor that I can work with and ask questions to and we can talk about cases and different experiences even though we both went to the same optometry school we did different residencies and so we have different experiences and that helps us serve our patients better.

Dr. Beth: [00:03:44] And it’s really great – it is a lot of fun.

Dr. Nate: [00:03:48] Dr. Beth spends a little bit more time at the family practice. I spend a little bit more time at the kids office and that’s primarily just because she lives closer to the Westchase office and I live closer to the New Tampa office because we’re both plenty capable of doing both but we have a lot of fun.

Dr. Beth: [00:04:09] We really like our job and working with patients of all ages. It’s surprising to people when they find out that we routinely see patients that are six months old. Sometimes a little younger. It’s something that we really enjoy.

Dr. Nate: [00:04:28] What do you do when you’re not working with patients.

Dr. Beth: [00:04:33] I love spending time with my family and I especially love spending time out on my small sailboat. I love being outside doing pretty much anything whether it’s camping or biking. We always love being outside and Florida is a great place to be doing all those things as opposed to our cold winters that we had in Chicago.

Dr. Nate: [00:05:01] It was cold. It’s true. I also like doing things outside. I like to run and go camping. We have a lot of people in my family who play music and so we make music and I like to read and spend time with my family. And sometimes when we have time we like to travel and I’d say that’s mostly what we do.

Dr. Nate: [00:05:31] So we’re going to cover many topics about eyes and vision glasses contacts and vision therapy and Ortho-K. What other topics are we going to cover?

Dr. Beth: [00:05:45] We’re going to cover brain injuries and how that affects the eyes. We will cover why sunglasses are important for your vision and even topics about certain eye diseases you may have heard of like cataracts and macular degeneration.

Dr. Nate: [00:06:02] Yes. So thank you for listening to our very first episode ever. If you have any questions comments or suggestions you can e-mail us at office@BrightEyesTampa.com. Until next time. Have fun and be safe.

If you have questions about your or your children’s eyes or vision please call us at 813-792-0637 or use the button below to request an appointment.
Schedule An Appointment

Brought to you by Bright Eyes Family Vision Care and Bright Eyes Kids. Find previous episodes and more detailed information at BrightEyesTampa.com. Creative Commons Copyright attribution, non-commercial use.

The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro and outro music by Lucas Warford.

2017 Spring Newsletter:New Hours, Sales, Giveaway, Ortho-K, VR & more!

 

Hello, Bright Eyes Patients! Welcome to our first email update of 2017. We have so much to tell you that we’ll get right to it:

Not One But Two Spring Events

Spring EventsSpring has sprung and we have 2 big events coming up! The first is our Spring Eyewear Show on Wednesday, April 26 from 4 to 8pm. This is a trunk show of all the Banana Republic and Smith Optics eyeglasses, including sunglasses. Win a FREE pair of prescription sunglasses from Smith! The second is the Spring Cleaning Sale Monday April 24 through Friday, April 28. The doctors are away at a conference most of the week, but both offices will be open – all eyeglasses and sunglasses on sale! Read more here.

Hours Reminder

Our Westchase office has new hours: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday 9am-5pm. Wednesday is still 12-8pm, Friday 8:30am-4:30pm and Saturday 9am-2pm. See all the details here.

Big News about Ortho-K!

We have been getting more requests than ever about Ortho-K, the overnight contact lenses that allows for clear, glasses-free vision. You might have seen Dr. Nate on the news! You can read about Dr. Nate’s daughter’s own experience with Orthok-K and also read more about the process here. Treehouse Eyes is an office in Washington DC that specializes in myopia control, and they did a story on Dr. Nate’s daughter.

VR Home Therapy is Live

We are one of the first eye doctors to offer Vivid Vision Virtual Reality Vision Therapytreatment for amblyopia and strabismus, but we are now able to offer this treatment as part of a home Vision Therapy program. This is a game-changer for patients both children and adults. If you are interested, call us at 813-792-0637.

Updated Website

You may have noticed that we’ve been hard at work on our website BrightEyesTampa.com, especially pages on Myopia Control, Ortho-k, Vivid Vision and others. Check it out!

Other topics of interest from our blog

We’ve covered some important topics such as Top 10 For Screentime, Women’s Eye Health & Safety Month, Cleaning Your Glasses, The Importance Blue Light, & Eye Color.

Reviews

Finally, we want to say that we are very thankful for all the Yelp and Google reviews. Most people find us through online reviews or word-of-mouth, and as a small business, we appreciate it! If you haven’t left a review, it would mean a lot if you did.

Thanks and have a great spring! 🙂

-Dr. Nate

Bright Eyes Family and Bright Eyes Kids

A custom uploaded image.

2 Events: Smith Optics Show/Banana Republic Show and Spring Cleaning Eyewear Sale!

 

Event 1: Spring Eyewear Show!

Wednesday, April 26 – 4 to 8pm

25% OFF 1st pair – 50% Off 2nd Pair

Bright Eyes Family Vision Care – Westchase

Win FREE SMITH PRESCRIPTION SUNGLASSES!

Featuring Smith Optics and Banana Republic.

Every style, every color, every size to try on Eyeglasses! Sunglasses! Women! Men!

 

Spring2

Event 2: Spring Cleaning Sale

Mon, April 24 – Fri, April 28

One week! Two offices!

Every frame on SALE! $50 – $100 OFF!

 

Spring Events

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Read this Important Information About COVID-19 and Bright Eyes!