Skip to main content

2 locations, 1 phone number
New Tampa & Westchase
Call (813) 358-0400
Schedule An Appointment

Home »

Uncategorized

How to Keep Glasses from Getting Foggy

Whether you live in a cold climate or have visited one in the winter, you have probably seen someone who just walked in from the cold outdoors sporting glasses that are no longer transparent, or perhaps you’ve experienced it yourself.

Why Do Glasses Fog Up?

There are several factors that cause your glasses to fog up — one of which is ambient heat, in other words, the actual temperature in your surrounding environment. Eyelashes that touch the lens can cause fogging, as well as tight-fitting frames that touch the cheeks (many plastic frames cause this problem), which impede proper airflow. Lastly, high humidity and the sweat and moisture that accompany overexertion/ exercise can also trigger foggy lenses.

Ultimately, glasses cloud over due to moisture in the air condensing on the cold surface of your lenses.

Now that you know the most common reasons why your glasses fog up, it’s time to read about some possible solutions. Below are a few tips to help keep your lenses clear year-round.

6 Tips to Steer Clear of Cloudy Specs

1. Invest in Anti-Fog Coating

Anti-fog coating blocks out moisture that would normally stick to your lenses, by creating a surface layer that repels water and mist. An optician applies the treatment to both sides of the lens in order to prevent fogging so you can see clearly in any climate or environment.

Ask us about our proven anti-fog treatment for your glasses and be on your way to clearer vision, all the time.

2. Use Anti-Fog Wipes, Sprays, or Creams

Commercial anti-fog products are an alternative to lens coatings. These products, typically sold in either gel or spray form, are specially designed to prevent condensation and moisture from building up on your lenses. Apply the product as directed on the packaging and remove it with the supplied cloth, wipe or towelette. If a cloth wasn’t included in the box, use a scratch-free cloth.

Aside from the gel or spray, you can use anti-fog wipes. These pre-treated napkins are perfect for those who are on the go.

3. Move Your Glasses Further Away from Your Face

Eyeglasses tend to trap moisture and heat, particularly if they are positioned close to your eyes or face, which increases the buildup of fog on your lenses. Consider adjusting the position of your eyewear by pushing your glasses slightly further down your nose. It will stimulate proper air circulation, thereby reducing fog accumulation.

4. Wear Your Seasonal Accessories Wisely

If the weather cools down, try not to wear too many layers, to prevent overheating and producing sweat, which can make your glasses to fog up more. Wear only the necessary amount of clothing to stay warm. If you’re wearing a scarf, consider one with an open weave or a more breathable material to let the air pass through.

5. Avoid Abrupt Temperature Changes

Allow your eyewear to acclimate to changes in temperature. If you are moving from an environment that is cold into one which is warm and humid, try to let your glasses adjust accordingly.

For instance:

  • As you enter a building, stand in the doorway for a minute or two as the temperature slowly transitions from cool to warm.
  • When in the car, gradually adjust the heat, particularly when your hands aren’t free to simply remove your glasses and wipe off the fog.

Fogged up glasses are not only irritating but can also be dangerous, especially for those who drive, ski, or operate machinery. So make sure to take the necessary precautions, especially as the weather changes.

6. Swap Glasses for Contact Lenses

If contacts are an option for you, you might want to wear them on those cold days, to avoid foggy glasses syndrome (yeah, that’s a made-up term).

 

Want to keep your glasses from fogging up? Speak with Dr. Elizabeth Knighton. At Bright Eyes Family Vision Care in Tampa, we can advise you about a variety of contact lenses, anti-fog treatment and other solutions to help you see clearly— any day.

Podcast Episode #5: Eclipse Safety

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

In this episode, Dr. Nate talks about importance of eye protection during the total eclipse.

Full Transcript: (Dr. Nate)

  • From partial-eclipse territory in Tampa, Florida it’s the Bright Eyes Podcast. My name is Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford and I’m excited to talk about this important topic. There’s lots of people that are talking about the upcoming eclipse and I think that that’s great because this is a once in a lifetime opportunity for lots of people. I don’t know if you remember the eclipse that occurred in 1979. I do remember getting together with people and watching it. This is the first total collapse to cut across continental path over the United States since 1918 and lots of people are going to be watching the eclipse. There’s only a small band from Oregon to South Carolina where about 12,000,000 people live that they’re gonna be able to see the total eclipse. I have friends that are traveling to that narrow area so that they can see it in person. But the reason why I’m doing this episode of the podcast is not so much for the astronomical interest but because of the potential for harm that can happen if you are not prepared.
  • Now, last episode Dr. Beth and I talked about types of damage that can occur both short term and long term from ultraviolet light. Well when we’re talking about the eclipse, when we’re talking about actually looking at the sun, this is ultraviolet light damage on steroids! Now you’ve been told (probably your entire life) “do not look directly at the sun” and that’s true at all times, but it’s especially true during an eclipse when the most interesting thing going on is the sun and its relationship to the moon and the earth. Why that’s such a big deal is because there is something called “solar retinopathy” or sometimes called “eclipse blindness”. What happens is, if you look directly at the sun, the focused light of the sun can cause permanent damage to the back of the eye. However, the back of the eye does not have any pain sensors so you won’t feel any pain or see any symptoms right away. What will happen is later on, later that day or the next day you might notice that you’re having trouble seeing. Just as a quick example if you ever look at a strobe light briefly or if you look at a light bulb that doesn’t have a lamp shade on it, you see what’s called an after-image. And it’s just a little image that you see for a little while and it’s different colors and it slowly fades away. That is the where these photoreceptors of the back of the eye are over-stimulated. It takes awhile for them to get down to regular levels. This is it completely different phenomenon. This (solar retinopathy) is where there’s actual damage to the back of the eye. And so while it’s very exciting, and I do encourage everybody to check it out, I do want everybody to do that safely. So I have 4 items that were published by the American Optometric Association and I’m going to read them and then comment on them just a little bit.
  • Number 1: use approved solar eclipse viewers. The only safe way to view a partial solar eclipse is through special purpose solar filters such as eclipse glasses or viewers that meet international standards ISO 12312-2 for safe viewing. Sunglasses, smoked glasses, unfiltered telescope or magnifiers, polarized filters are unsafe. If you can’t find eclipse viewers, build a pinhole projector to watch the eclipse.
  • So a couple different things here. First of all, pinhole projectors are pin hole viewers are pretty cool and you can do that anytime you don’t necessarily have to do that during eclipse time. And so I would encourage anybody to check that out and I’ll put a link in the show notes. But mostly people are going to use a solar eclipse viewers and and what I really want to point out about that is 1) do get them. They’re very inexpensive. We’ve got some the for the staff, because it’s happening during our business hours, and you can get the many different places I will put a link (below). But the most important thing is: I’ve read news articles about how there are fake solar viewers and so you should test yours out to make sure that they’re safe. And the easiest way to test them out is put them on and make sure the only thing that you can see through them is essentially the sun. Anything that’s less bright than the sun, like a computer monitor or a flashlight or a light in the house, you should NOT be able to see through it. If you can, then that’s not safe. The other thing is they do sell filters for telescopes and it’s very important that you not use the viewing glasses or the eclipse glasses to look through the telescope because the telescope has concentrated that light so brightly that that’s not anywhere near a sufficient protection.
  • eclipse picNumber 2: Technique of the pros: Before looking at the sun, cover your eyes with the eclipse viewers.. While standing still, glance at the sun and then turn away and remove your filters. Do not remove your filters while looking at the sun.
  • So this accomplishes 2 purposes. First, of all you can’t wear the solar viewing protection full time because you can’t see anything. (And if anybody remembers the peril sensitive sunglasses from Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, it’s kinda like that – in scary situations). So you can’t just wear these all the time. But what you want to do is you want to position yourself so you’re not walking around, put them on look at the eclipse look away, and then take them off. That ensures that you’re protecting your eyes from the sun and you’re protecting your body from walking around.
  • Number 3: Totally awesome. Only within the path of totality can eclipse viewers safely be removed to view the eclipse. Once the sun begins reappearing, however, viewers must be replaced.
  • And so this is true. But I still want to provide a note of caution. The eclipse is only going to be in totality for 2 minutes and 40 seconds (at longest) so during that time if you’re in the path of the total eclipse. You can take off your viewers you can look at the eclipse, however I don’t encourage you to do that for very long because very quickly the sun’s going to reappear in you’re going to be at risk again. So I would only encourage you to do that for a short amount of time and then replace your viewers as the sun becomes exposed.
  • And finally: Visit your doctor of optometry if you should experience any discomfort or vision problems following the eclipse visit your doctor of optometry for a comprehensive exam.
  • Now, of course we recommend that people get exams regularly anyways but this is one of those special situations. I have a few other links that I’m going to put in about the eclipse that I think are interesting: the map and some information about the solar viewers. I hope everybody enjoys it has a great time. I’m very much looking forward to it. I know my kids are. But I’ve mostly want everybody to stay safe. If you have any questions let us know at office@BrightEyesTampa.com. We’ll see you next time!

Links:

 

Thank you for listening. If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, you can email us at office@brighteyestampa.com.

The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/107937702@N04/

Understanding Eye Color

eyes green close up woman

People always ask Dr. Beth and me about the color of their eyes. Are they brown? Hazel? Green? Well, it is complicated. Eye color is a hereditary trait that depends on the genes of both parents, as well as a little bit of mystery. The color of the eye is based on the pigments in the iris, which is a colored ring of muscle located at the center of the eye (around the pupil) that helps to control the amount of light that comes into your eye. Eye color falls on a spectrum of color that can range from dark brown, to gray, to green, to blue, with a whole lot of variation in between.

Genetics

The genetics of eye color are anything but straightforward. In fact children are often born with a different eye color than either of their parents. For some time the belief was that two blue-eyed parents could not have a brown-eyed child, however, while it’s not common, this combination can and does occur. Genetic research in regards to eye color is an ongoing pursuit and while they have identified certain genes that play a role, researchers still do not know exactly how many genes are involved and to what extent each gene affects the final eye color.

The Iris

Looking at it simply, the color of the eye is based on the amount of the pigment melanin located in the iris. Large amounts of melanin result in brown eyes, while blue eyes result from smaller amounts of the pigment. This is why babies that are born with blue eyes (who often have smaller amounts of melanin until they are about a year old) often experience a darkening of their eye color as they grow and develop more melanin in the iris. In adults across the globe, the most common eye color worldwide is brown, while lighter colors such as blue, green and hazel are found predominantly in the Caucasian population.

Abnormal Eye Color

Sometimes the color of a person’s eyes are not normal. Here are some interesting causes of this phenomenon.

Heterochromia, for example, is a condition in which the two eyes are different colors, or part of one eye is a different color. This can be caused by genetic inconsistencies, issues that occur during the development of the eye, or acquired later in life due to an injury or disease.

Ocular albinism is a condition in which the eye is a very light color due to low levels of pigmentation in the iris, which is the result of a genetic mutation. It is usually accompanied by serious vision problems. Oculocutaneous albinism is a similar mutation in the body’s ability to produce and store melanin that affects skin and hair color in addition to the eyes.

Eye color can also be affected by certain medications. For example, a certain glaucoma eye drop is known to darken light irises to brown, as well as lengthen and darken eyelashes.

Eye Color – It’s More Than Meets the Eye

It is known that light eyes are more sensitive to light, which is why it might be hard for someone with blue or green eyes to go out into the sun without sunglasses. Light eyes have also shown to be a risk factor for certain conditions including age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Color Contact Lenses

While we can’t pick our eye color, we can always play around with different looks using colored contact lenses. Just be sure that you get a proper prescription for any contact lenses, including cosmetic colored lenses, from an eye doctor! Wearing contact lenses that were obtained without a prescription could be dangerous to your eyes and your vision.

-Dr. Nate

 

 

 

Dry Eye Syndrome Causes and Cures

cactus2

Why Are My Eyes So Dry?

Do you experience dry, scratchy, burning eyes, redness or pain, a gritty feeling like something is in your eye? I do. Or perhaps, excessive tearing, blurred vision, eye fatigue or discomfort wearing contact lenses? I definitely do. There could be a number of causes for your symptoms including allergies, reactions to an irritant or medication or an infection. You could also have a chronic condition called Dry Eye Syndrome.

It’s estimated that one out of every eight adults suffers to some extent from dry eye syndrome, which can range from mild to severe. Despite the fact that it is one of the most common eye problems, a surprisingly large percentage of patients are not aware of it.

What is Dry Eye Syndrome?

Dry Eye does not mean literally eyes with no water. Your eyes need a layer of tears to lubricate the surface and keep the eyes comfortable, clean and clear. These tears also wash away particles, dust and bacteria that can lead to infection and eye damage. Dry eye syndrome occurs when there is a chronic lack of lubrication on the surface of the eye either because not enough tears are being produced, the quality of the tears is weak or they evaporate too quickly. This causes the common uncomfortable symptoms including:

  • Itching
  • Burning
  • Redness
  • Soreness or pain
  • Dryness (and sometimes even excessive tearing because the eyes are trying to compensate)
  • Light sensitivity
  • Eye fatigue
  • Blurred vision
  • Grittiness or a feeling like there is something in your eye
  • Vision seems to change when blinking

Factors that Contribute to Dry Eye Syndrome

There are a number of factors that can increase your risk of suffering from Dry Eye Syndrome. While some of them are inherent, there are some environmental factors that can be changed to reduce your risk or symptoms. Risk factors include:

  • Aging: While it can occur at any age, dry eye is more common in individuals over age 50.
  • Women: Likely related to hormonal fluctuations, women are more likely to develop dry eyes than men, especially during pregnancy, menopause or when using birth control pills.
  • Digital screen use: Whether it is a computer, a smartphone or a tablet, when our eyes are focused on a digital screen we tend to blink less, increasing tear evaporation and increasing dryness, blurriness and discomfort. Remember to regularly take a break, look away from the screen and blink several times.
  • Medications: A number of medications – both prescription and nonprescription – have been found to cause dry eye symptoms including certain blood pressure regulators, antihistamines, nasal decongestants, tranquilizers and antidepressants.
  • Contact lenses: Dry eyes is a common problem in contact lens wear. Several manufacturers have started offering lenses that hold more moisture to combat this common issue.
  • Dry air: Whether it is the air conditioning or forced-air heating inside or the dry, windy climate outside, the environment of the air around you can contribute to dry eyes by causing your tears to evaporate too quickly.
  • LASIK: One side effect of LASIK and other corneal refractive surgery is dry eyes, which usually lasts about 3-6 months and eventually resolves itself.
  • Eyelid conditions: Certain conditions which prevent the eyelid from closing completely when sleeping or even blinking can cause the eye to try out.
  • Allergies or infections: Chronic inflammation of the conjunctiva which is often caused by allergies or infections such as Blepharitis can result in dry eyes.
  • Systemic diseases: People with autoimmune diseases or systemic conditions such as diabetes, thyroid disease, Sjogren’s syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus are also more prone to Dry Eye.

How do you treat dry eye symptoms?

If you have dry eyes, you don’t need to suffer. There are a number of treatment options that can help, depending on the severity and cause of your condition, which can reduce symptoms and enhance your comfort.

Treatments for dry eyes can include non-prescription or prescription eye drops, omega 3 supplements, special lid therapies, punctal plugs, ointments, different contact lenses, goggles or ergonomic changes to your work station. Speak to your eye doctor to discuss the cause of your dry eye and the best remedy for you. Even when it comes to the seemingly straightforward treatments like over-the-counter eye drops, they aren’t all the same. Different ingredients are tailored towards different causes of dry eye.

-Dr. Nate

TC Charton – Asian Fit Eyeglasses

TC Charton logoTC Charton adultsHave you been all over Tampa, trying on pair after pair of eyeglasses, only to find that none of them seem to fit your nose or they touch your cheeks? Let’s face it, we’re all different, including the shape and symmetry of our face. Sometimes it is difficult for Asian or African-American patients to find comfortable glasses in the correct size in a style they like.

We are happy to announce we just ordered a new frame line called TC Charton that might solve this problem! Alexandra Peng Charton has worked in the optical industry for more than 16 years. In addition to knowing how frames should fit, she has personally experienced the frustration of trying to find the perfect frame for herself. So she designed her own “Asian-Fit” frame line, that she found works for many different ethnicities.

TC Charton kidsAccording to her website “the brand was designed to accommodate higher cheekbones, lower nose bridges and other ethnic features that make conventional eyewear impossible or uncomfortable to wear. With dozens of frame styles, the wearer can have a great fit without having to compromise on style and luxury.” TC Charton has frames for men, women, and children. You can browse their selection by using the link below. Come see us and find your “glass slipper” of eye wear!

-Bright Eyes Optical Staff

Pink, Stinging Eyes?

Conjunctivitis, also called pink eye, is one of the most frequently seen eye diseases, especially in kids. It can be caused by viruses, bacteria or even allergies to pollen, chlorine in swimming pools, and ingredients in cosmetics, or other irritants, which touch the eyes. Some forms of conjunctivitis might be quite transmittable and quickly spread in school and at the office.

Conjunctivitis is seen when the conjunctiva, or thin transparent layer of tissue covering the white part of the eye, becomes inflamed. You can identify conjunctivitis if you notice eye redness, discharge, itching or swollen eyelids and a crusty discharge surrounding the eyes early in the day. Pink eye infections can be divided into three main types: viral, allergic and bacterial conjunctivitis.

The viral type is usually a result of a similar virus to that which produces the recognizable red, watery eyes, sore throat and runny nose of the common cold. The red, itchy, watery eyes caused by viral pink eye are likely to last from a week to two and then will clear up on their own. You may however, be able to reduce some of the discomfort by using soothing drops or compresses. Viral pink eye is transmittable until it is completely cleared up, so in the meantime maintain excellent hygiene, remove eye discharge and try to avoid using communal pillowcases or towels. If your son or daughter has viral conjunctivitis, he or she will have to be kept home from school for three days to a week until symptoms disappear.

A bacterial infection such as Staphylococcus or Streptococcus is usually treated with antibiotic eye drops or cream. One should notice an improvement within just a few days of antibiotic drops, but be sure to adhere to the full prescription dosage to prevent pink eye from recurring.

Allergic pink eye is not contagious. It is usually a result of a known allergy such as hay fever or pet allergies that sets off an allergic reaction in their eyes. First of all, to treat allergic pink eye, you should eliminate the irritant. Use cool compresses and artificial tears to relieve discomfort in mild cases. When the infection is more severe, your eye doctor might prescribe a medication such as an anti-inflammatory or antihistamine. In cases of chronic allergic pink eye, topical steroid eye drops could be used.

Pink eye should always be diagnosed by a qualified eye doctor in order to identify the type and best course of treatment. Never treat yourself! Keep in mind the sooner you begin treatment, the lower chance you have of giving pink eye to loved ones or prolonging your discomfort.

 

Welcome to our New Website

We invite you to take a look around our new site to get to know our practice and learn about eye and vision health. You will find a wealth of information about our optometrists, our staff and our services, as well as facts and advice about how to take care of your eyes and protect your vision.

Learn about our Practice specialties including comprehensive eye exams, contact lens fittings and the treatment of eye diseases. Our website also offers you a convenient way to find our hours, address and map, schedule an appointment online, order contact lenses or contact us to ask us any questions you have about eye care and our Practice.

Have a look around our online office and schedule a visit to meet us in person. We are here to partner with you and your family for a lifetime of healthy eyes and vision. We look forward to seeing you!

Dr. Nate Talks About Vision and Reading Problems at the Healthy Family Fair

Healthy Family Fair

Bright Eyes loves to be involved in the Tampa Bay community. So when we were invited to sponsor and participate in Tampa Bay Healthy Family Fair, we jumped at the chance.

The fair is organized by the Tampa Bay Mom’s Group, an incredibly dedicated group for moms (and dads) to share information and socialize. The group regularly puts on events such as the Healthy Family Fair. The fair features all of this:

  • Goody-bags for the first 150 families
  • Free Entry into Raffles & Giveaways
  • Access to all the Museum’s open Exhibits
  • Access to a Special Limited Engagement Exhibit of The Wizard of Oz
  • Goodies, Treats, Samples & Swag from a Variety of Vendors
  • A Chance to Shop with some Great Local Businesses
  • Education & Information Sessions with Experts Available to Answer your Questions
  • 50% off Admission goes directly to support The Glazer Children’s Museum
  • And just outside the museum, The Gasparilla Festival of the Arts will be taking place!

The fair is happening at one of our favorite spots – the Glazer Children’s Museum this Saturday February 28th. You could win 4 free tickets here.

Join us at 2 pm, as our own Dr. Nate will be presenting his talk:

Kids with Reading Problems: Could It Be Their Eyes?

Most school age children have healthy eyes and 20/20 vision. But many of these same children have problems learning to read because they have a hard time moving and focusing their eyes to get the information from the page to their brain. Learn what the warning signs are for learning-related vision problems and what can be done about it.

Here is the complete agenda for the special sessions:

agenda poster to print

 

Visual Skills Needed for School: What to Look For

1172548_10150392203379977_1539208274_oI know it is the height of summer. But the “back to school” season is right around the corner. New schools, new teachers, and new challenges await every student. Good vision is among the many skills children need to read, write and learn their best. Many parents do not realize that vision is more than being able to see the words on a page or board clearly, but it is actually a form of fine-motor skill. Just like it takes years to master the fine motor skill of controlling the tiny muscle of the fingers to write legibly, it takes years to master the coordination of the even smaller muscles that move and focus the eyes. Continue reading