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Podcast Episode #19: Dr. Beth with Chelsea on Sports Vision

Sports Vision FacebookWelcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

In this episode, Dr. Beth talks about Sports Vision with Bright Eye’s own Chelsea Lewis.

You can listen in the player below or read the transcript. The show is available via Stitcher, iTunes, and the webplayer below. You can find all previous episodes here. If you have any questions or suggestions for future episodes, please email office@BrightEyesTampa.com.

 

 

Full Transcript:

Intro (00:10):

Welcome to the Bright Eyes Podcast: advice for healthy vision for all ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-warford and Dr. Beth Knighton, residency trained optometrists providing eyecare to all ages with exams, for glasses and contacts and specialty services, including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission is to empower patients by providing the best in friendly professional and individualized eyecare care

Dr. Beth (00:39):

From the amazing Tampa bay. It is the bright eyes podcast. This is episode number 19, and I’m Dr. Beth Knighton.

Chelsea (00:47):

I’m I’m Chelsea Lewis, a vision therapist at bright eyes.

Dr. Beth (00:50):

So today we’re really excited to share with you about sports, vision training and all the dynamic visual skills that are needed for the different sports. And we are really lucky because we are talking to you from the beautiful Tampa, Florida, which we have adopted the nickname Tampa bay, because the Tampa bay Lightning have won back to back Stanley Cups in 2020 and 2021. And they’re in the playoffs right now. And the Buccaneers won Superbowl 50 at home, and then the Tampa Bay Rays were American League champs in 2020. So we’ve got a lot going on here in Tampa, and we are so excited to kind of incorporate our love for sports and our love for vision all together.

Chelsea (01:30):

Yes. So I think we should start off by telling everyone what sports vision training is. As many of, you know, athletes know they need to train their body with weightlifting or running drills and cardio exercise, but many athletes neglect to train their visual skills, which could be putting them at a disadvantage.

Dr. Beth (01:47):

You know, for some athletes, sports vision training is working on areas of weakness in order to make improvements. But for the vast majority of athletes, we are taking them at their average visual skills and taking them up to excellent visual skills. If you have an average skill, that’s usually not enough to progress in your sport to elite levels. And this is across the board from cardio to hand eye coordination to the visual skills.

Chelsea (02:14):

So also it’s important to mention that any athlete in any sport at any level can benefit from sports vision training. We’re talking about little league baseball, first basemen, middle school soccer, midfielder, high school football quarterback, college basketball, forwards, amateur adult tennis players, professional hockey goers, and even umpires at any level. Our team at Bright Eyes Family Vision Care has worked with athletes at every level.

Dr. Beth (02:40):

And there’s also lots of examples of famous pros. Who’ve included vision training in their preparation. Larry Fitzgerald is an 11 time pro bowl wide receiver for the Arizona Cardinals. And he has done a lot of vision training, especially early in his career. Steph Curry, who is a three time NBA champion is known for all of his visual and cognitive training that he does. Jarvis Landry is a five time pro bowl wide receiver. Who’s now with the new Orleans saints. And he does a lot of work with S stroboscopic glasses and other vision training. And Kauai Leonard is a two time NBA champion forward. And these are just some of the famous people who are using sports vision training to progress their career. And this sports vision training really goes through all the different levels. So college teams are using this now, minor league teams, major league teams. It’s really across the board in sports. This is making a big difference in their athletes.

Dr. Beth (03:44):

So what are we gonna be looking for when we evaluate someone for sports vision? So the first step is making sure that the athlete can see clearly for distance and for up close. So most athletes actually have better than 2020 vision. And if your athlete needs vision correction, there’s actually a lot of options. There are sports vision goggles and contact lenses. And if they’re the right age in candidate, maybe refractive surgery like LASIK, there are also overnight contact lenses that can be used to help correct the vision during the day. So that’s the first step you have to see clearly, and not just average clearly, but really that elite level of clarity at that 2015 or even 2010 vision. Next, we’re gonna test the visual skills to see how well the two eyes work together, how well the eyes can adjust, focus from one distance to another, how well the eyes can move and track objects in motion and how well the athlete interprets all this information from their peripheral vision.

Dr. Beth (04:45):

Our brain is taking in all the information, processing it, and then making a decision about how to move our feet, how to move our hands, how to move our body in reaction to that. So we want that process to be as fast and efficient as possible. We’re also looking at how well the athlete can pay attention to multiple things at the same time, how quickly the brain can process that information, and then how easily the brain can store and recall short-term memory. We use all of this data to customize a training program for each athlete. We’re looking at a lot of different skills. So I just wanted to kind of highlight a few. The first is visual acuity. We talked about this just a second ago about that. We really need to see the very small details, the 2015 or better vision, but there’s two different ways that we look at visual acuity.

Dr. Beth (05:36):

There’s static visual acuity, which is when the athlete and what they’re looking at are both stationary and dynamic visual acuity, which is when the athlete and the object are in motion. For most sports dynamic. Visual acuity is really the key here. So an athlete may have 20/15 static visual acuity, but when things start moving, maybe their dynamic visual acuity is only 20/30 or 20/40. So we wanna boost that so they can be able to process the information while they are moving. Another skill that’s really important is depth perception. This is the ability to accurately judge the distance of objects and how that relates to where the athlete is. Standing in. Baseball depth perception is really important for batters because they need to know exactly when to swing, to make contact with the ball, but outfielders need the best depth perception of anyone on the field, because they are judging balls that are in an arc out towards them, knowing where they need to stand on the field in order to be exactly at the ball’s trajectory.

Dr. Beth (06:42):

They also need to be able to accurately throw the ball to make the play. And so their depth perception not only needs to be accurate, but able to adjust with a moving target. Another skill that we look at is contrast, sensitivity and contrast is the ability to detect an object with various backgrounds. One example of using our contrast sensitivity is a golfer. Who’s trying to read the green when they’re putting the very subtle differences in the color of the green can tell them where there’s a break and tell them where they need to put. So the contrast sensitivity is extremely important for golf. Another skill is peripheral awareness. So this is being able to notice things out of the corner of your eye and for sports like lacrosse or soccer, we need to be able to use our central vision, to see the details of things, but also have awareness of our periphery so that we can see the ball, see our teammates, see the opponents, see the goal, and we need to be able to process all of that information.

Dr. Beth (07:46):

Simultaneously. Another skill that we look at is visual concentration, and this is the ability to focus attention on a task or multiple tasks simultaneously. So if you think about in basketball, you get a breakaway, you’re dribbling, you’re paying attention to where you are on the court, but you’re also noticing the people around you and maybe you’re coaches, and maybe your coach is signaling to you from the sideline. You need to be able to look at all of that at once and know what’s the important things to pay attention to. If you get distracted by something that’s not important, it could take your eyes off the ball or take your eyes off the goal, and you may miss your shot.

Chelsea (08:24):

So if any of you are interested in sports vision training for either you or your child, again, this can be for any athlete at any level, check out our webpage, bright eyes, tampa.com, or call to speak with one of our vision training experts at 813-792-0637. We’d love to set up a consultation to discuss how vision training can improve your skills in your specific sport,

Outro (08:49):

Brought to you by Bright Eyes Family Vision Care and Bright Eyes kids. Find previous episodes and more detailed information at BrightEyesTampa.com. Creative Commons Copyright attribution Noncommercial use. The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your position for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

 

Join us for a sports vision training clinic July 23!

Ready to take your athletic performance to the next level?

Sports Vision Facebook

 

Join us for a sports vision training clinic! One session on July 23rd at our Bright Eyes Family – (Westchase location)

🏈 ⚾️ 🏀

Processing visual information faster on the field can help you better anticipate direction and speed which allows you to make quick decisions. Sports vision training will:

– improve your reaction time

– more efficient tracking of objects in motion

– flexibility of focusing

– hand-eye coordination 👀

Space is limited! Call us today to reserve your spot — 813-792-0637 📞

Tips to Avoid a Concussion or TBI

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The complexity of the brain is truly fascinating; any slight change in its chemistry or structural integrity can result in a multitude of health problems, such as visual disturbances or permanent vision loss. This can affect everyday activities such as driving, walking, reading, using a computer, and staying focused. Below we’ll discuss what traumatic brain injury is and how to avoid one.

What Is a Traumatic Brain Injury?

A Traumatic Brain Injury, or TBI, is an injury to the brain caused by physical trauma, typically a sudden blow or bump to the head.

Concussions — a mild form of brain injury — are very common and makeup 75% of all TBI incidents. A concussion involves a short loss of normal brain function, as the hit can cause the brain to bounce around in rapid motion within the skull, occasionally causing chemical changes or damaging brain cells.

Moderate to severe TBIs cause the victim to lose consciousness from a few minutes to several hours. This can impact cognitive capacity along with other visual symptoms, such as:

  • Difficulty reading and writing
  • Partial or total loss of vision
  • Light sensitivity
  • Double vision
  • Weakened eye muscles

There are numerous ways a TBI can occur, most of which are activities most of us do on a daily basis.

What Causes Traumatic Brain Injury?

Head injuries that cause TBI can happen during everyday activities such as running, hiking, swimming, or competitive sports.

The most common causes of TBIs are:

  • Sports injuries
  • Motor vehicle accidents
  • Falls
  • Being struck by an object

TBIs are more common than one would expect, affecting 10 million individuals around the globe annually. Below we’ll discuss what steps to take in order to prevent a TBI.

Tips for Avoiding Concussion and TBI

ski kidsOne of the best ways to protect against a concussion or TBI is to avoid any risky behavior. While this isn’t always possible, there are some steps you can take to protect your brain and eyes from trauma and damage.

Here are our top four tips:

1) Wear Protective Sports Gear

There are 3.8 million TBIs occurring each year in the US, and 20% are from sports. Wearing protective helmets and eyewear when playing basketball, baseball, or football can help prevent serious injuries, especially in children.

Speak with Dr. Knighton and Dr. Bonilla-Warford about shatter-resistant polycarbonate or Trivex lenses, known for their impact-resistant materials.

2) Wear Sunglasses

Sun glare can cause momentary blindness. It’s that quick second of feeling blinded by the sun while you’re outside, driving in a car, or at the beach that can make you vulnerable to injury. An easy way to guard against this is by wearing sunglasses.

Sunglasses with polarized lenses prevent glare from entering your eyes by blocking strong light that reflects off surfaces such as glass, water, snow, sand, or pavement. Make sure that the sunglasses you choose contain 100% UV-blocking protection. Photochromic lenses are a smart option for those with prescription eyeglasses, as they darken when outside and revert back to clear lenses when indoors.

3) Pay Attention To Your Surroundings

As obvious as this may sound, people often forget to pay close attention to their surrounding environment. We all know that talking on the phone or texting while driving is dangerous, but being unaware of what’s happening around you can pose certain risks as well. Try to reduce your distractions when walking, driving, or performing any extraneous labor. When outdoors, be on the lookout for sharp objects or debris that can pose a risk.

4) Don’t Forget to Wear Your Seatbelt

Parents and doctors have been drumming it into our heads for years, and for good reason! The #1 way to prevent or reduce car accident injuries is by wearing a seatbelt. According to The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2.6 million American drivers and passengers were treated in hospital emergency rooms for car accident-related injuries in 2016. Transport Canada estimates that 25% of car accidents where victims were not wearing seat belts resulted in serious injuries, while 55% were fatal. In fact, car accidents are the number one cause of TBI-related deaths in America, especially among adults aged 20-24.

How a TBI Affects Vision

A TBI can negatively impact your vision, leading to sensitivity to light, blurry or double vision, or persistent eyestrain. In many cases, certain types of activities that were easier before the TBI suddenly become difficult. These include reading a book, driving a car, or watching TV.

Studies show that about 90% of TBI patients suffer from such visual dysfunctions, making it all the more critical to take precautionary measures in staying safe.

If you or a loved one displays any of these symptoms following a TBI, contact Bright Eyes Family Vision Care's Vision Therapy Center right away. Dr. Knighton and Dr. Bonilla-Warford can offer a neuro-optometric rehabilitation program to help regain any visual skills that were lost. Feel free to call us with any questions you may have – we’re here for you.

REFERENCES

https://www.traumaticbraininjury.com/severe-tbi-symptoms/

https://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/concussion-tbi.htm

https://noravisionrehab.org/patients-caregivers/facts-and-figures

https://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/seatbelts/facts.html

https://www.tc.gc.ca/en/services/road/publications/canadian-motor-vehicle-traffic-collision-statistics-2016.html

EnChroma gives a more colorful view of the Valspar PGA Tournament

This week, Bright Eyes was excited to partner with the Valspar PGA Tournament and EnChroma color blind glasses to help a young golf fan!

Bright Eyes optometrist Dr. Beth Knighton had the pleasure of assisting 2018 and 2019 Valspar Championship winner Paul Casey surprise her patient Ronan with a new pair of EnChroma glasses for color blindness.

Here is a photo of Dr. Beth, Ronan, and Paul Casey:

Ronan 1

Ronan and his family were so excited to visit different behind-the-scenes tour stops, get autographs from players like Patrick Reed and Sergio Garcia, and the surprise of a lifetime – to play the 18th hole with 2018 Valspar Champion, Paul Casey.

At the end of the hole, Paul pulled the EnChroma glasses to gift to Ronan, along with a complimentary eye exam from Bright Eyes Tampa presented by Dr. Beth. Then the tournament director presented five gallons of Valspar paint to transform Ronan’s room into his “new” favorite color.

Ronan had an immediate, happy reaction to the EnChroma glasses. Some memorable quotes from Ronan after putting on the glasses… “Everything just pops!”… “All of the colors are so much brighter, wow!”… “Mom, can I get a coloring book now?”

Here is an article and video by the PGA about Ronan’s time with Paul Casey and getting the EnChroma glasses.

EnChroma glasses can help 4 out of 5 Red-Green colorblind patients enhance color discrimination. Bright Eyes in Westchase carries several styles of EnChroma, including sunglasses and indoor tint glasses. Patients can try on the glasses for themselves before buying. It is so exciting to help patients see a more “colorful world”! If you would like to try the EnChroma glasses for yourself, call for an appointment with one of our experienced Optical Staff, and we will be happy to answer any questions.

Bright Eyes was very happy to help make this a special experience for Ronan and his family. Dr. Beth had a wonderful time at the Valspar PGA tournament! If you have any questions about EnChroma glasses for colorblindness or sports vision, please call us at 813-792-0637.

-Dr. Nate

Any Colorblind Golf Fans around?

 

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Bright Eyes is teaming up with the Valspar Championship and Enchroma to create a once-in-a-lifetime experience for one local teen or adult who is color blind. The experience will take place during tournament week of the PGA TOUR’s Valspar Championship, “the most colorful tournament on TOUR” – which is scheduled to take place at Innisbrook Resort and Golf Club in Palm Harbor March 18-24.

If you have a family member, friend, neighbor or co-worker who is color blind whom you would like to nominate to be part of this special opportunity and who has never used Echroma glasses before, we’d love to know! Click here to learn more about the surprises we have planned and nominate someone special, or send us a note at office@brighteyestampa.com.

We look forward to hearing from you,

-Dr. Nate and Dr. Beth

 

Podcast Episode #14: Adam Cegielski From Eyecarrot on Binovi

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

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In this episode, Dr. Nate talks with Adam Cegielski From Eyecarrot about Binovi and Binovi Touch.

You can listen in the player below or read the transcript. The show is available via Stitcher, Google Play, iTunes, and the webplayer below. You can find all previous episodes here. If you have any questions or suggestions for future episodes, please email office@BrightEyesTampa.com.


Full Transcript:

Intro: 00:10 Welcome to the Bright Eyes Podcast, advice for healthy vision for all ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nathan Bonilla-Warford and Dr Beth Knighton, residency trained optometrist providing eye care to all ages with exams or glasses and contacts and specialty services including vision therapy, Myopia control, orthokeratology and sports vision training. Their mission is to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional and individualized eye care

Dr. Nate: 00:39 From St. Petersburg beach in Florida. This is the bright eyes podcast. My name is Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford and I am here with Adam Cegielski. Adam is the CEO of a company called Eye Carrot and I’m so excited about this because I’ve wanted to do this for almost a year. I’ve been talking and emailing with Adam for a very long time. I’m a big believer in what he does and what his company does and I’ve wanted to get him on this podcast for a long time and it just finally happened that we are in the same room and we can, we can get it done. So how are you doing today, Adam?

Adam: 01:13 Oh, I’m doing great. Dr Nate. Thanks for having me.

Dr.nate: 01:16 Yeah, so this is, so this is really good. So we are here at the college of optometrists and Vision Development, Florida study group. This is an annual meeting that, happens in the summer and the doctors that provide vision therapy and are specialized in children’s vision a get together and we all take turns lecturing and sharing thoughts and cases and , you know, it, it’s, it’s a great meeting. Now you were able to come last year or when the meeting was in Miami you, had an opportunity to interact with some of the doctors and so it’s nice that you’re here and I think that you’re enjoying it because you are from Canada. Yeah. You know, coming down to Florida is not all bad.

Adam: 02:01 No, it’s absolutely great. It’s my second time here. I’ve actually been to Florida three times now because of the COVD annual meeting we had in Jacksonville and it’s not exactly cold right now in Toronto. We are escaping a bit of a heatwave.

Dr. Nate: 02:15 So our office, bright eyes kids was one of the first offices in the United States to have Binovi, which is the product that you guys make and I found out about it before you even really launched and I was very interested in the benefits that this could have for our patients, who do vision therapy. So why don’t you just very briefly introduce our listeners to what the Binovi system is and the different parts of it. And then we’ll go on from there.

Adam: 02:43 Oh, okay. Thanks. Dr. Nate. so really this whole started with my personal experience with vision therapy and my son’s rehabilitation back in Toronto and we had a great doctor help us achieve the goals of vision therapy and got through 40 weeks of therapy. But we had that experience of binders and papers and notes and as a, as a technology futurist or whatever we call ourselves. I and my partner Sam said, listen there’s, a better way to deliver therapy. We think and doing that, we, we sort of unveiled the idea that this should be delivered smoothly through a mobile app with videos with content and we built the Binovi platform, not really a product we built software and hardware that delivers a modern comprehensive experience that, that really maximizes what you get out of in-office therapy and gives you the tools you need at home to be able to do really good homebased therapy.

logo binovi finalAdam: 03:42 So, so the Binovi platform is really a mobile platform that allows the doctor and the therapy teams to deliver home based activities through one to two minute videos that really explain, you know, the way to do these activities which are complex, which are difficult. And that platform was launched and you were one of the first people to even talk to us before we even went live, and so we’ve now launched that software. We’ve launched some hardware and we’re at a spot where I can come back to this meeting and have the confidence of, of, you know, customers that are actually enjoying the product and using it.

Dr. Nate: 04:20 So, you know, I was very interested in what you guys are doing because like you said, vision therapy is very, very powerful, but it’s difficult if you’ve got these binders, these sheets of paper with instructions and you know, in, in our experience. And I think that this is pretty true for, for a lot of offices. The person who’s providing the home therapy is not always the person who brings the patient. There might be a grandma who’s bringing them because mom and dad are work

Dr. Nate: 04:51 Or we’ll live in split households. There’s different things going on. And so communication with the people who are assisting the patient at home, has always been been a challenge and it’s something that we’ve always tried to improve upon by, giving them a manual at home with instructions and those have links to YouTube videos and we’ve tried to make sure that everybody understands the process. But when I saw what you guys were doing, I said, Aha, this is this is a modern way to do this. And that’s why I was, I was on board,

Dr. Nate: 05:28 So what have other doctors told you about their experience with taking it live.

Adam: 05:36 Well, you made a really good point about sending materials home youtube links and you’re not the first person to have this idea. You know, we’ve had many, many doctors across the United States say they had the exact same idea, but obviously the development work to put this all together is, is extensive and took a lot of time and effort and money. Um, but doctors have, you know, have been waiting for some sort of a platform like this to come live. Obviously there’s a lot of different doctors in the United States, a lot of different ways to do therapy. and we’ve, we’ve obviously embraced as much and as many of the ideas as we can from, from all the different people using our software. But for the most part we’ve had really good experiences.

Binovi Touch in action.

Adam: 06:15 You’ve had some doctors that have said, listen, I haven’t done home therapy and years just because of the difficulties you’re explaining right now. And, uh, we live in a different world than we did five, 10 years ago. We have Netflix, we have these video delivery platforms, um, that are such a big part of our lives. And, uh, and really we’re, we’re now at a spot where, the cost of hosting video and the cost of doing these things is at a spot where it is suddenly scaleable. It is realistic. And you know, there are 2.7 billion people with smartphones, I think in the world at this point, maybe closer to 3 billion people. So naturally, video and compression of, of content and compression of data put us into a spot where we can do this. And doctors are absolutely loving the platform. Therapists are loving the platform. And most importantly, when we have a short term window where the, where the APP is not functioning, we realized its value when we have all these patients contacting us saying, I can’t live without this. I need this. Where is the APP? So we’ve had all sorts of really good feedback. And, you know, we’re, we’re in a really good spot right now

Dr. Nate: 07:24 So at our office we see vision therapy, you know, essentially as, as teaching learning and just like my son takes a cello lessons, he has to have both the instruction from an expert, but he also just needs time to practice. That’s that skill and he needs to know what to practice and, and so Binovi does a fantastic job of keeping the patients and the parents up to date on what they’re supposed to be doing. And there’s a checklist that patients and parents know what, what to do. There is a chat feature. So if parents or providers at home, there’s a chat feature, so whoever’s helping the patient at home can interact with the therapist right away and give them some information, that is really helpful. And um, what we like is we can actually see when patients are doing the therapy because patients who practice things get better at them in, you know, in my experience. And so that’s been really helpful.

Adam: 08:29 Yeah. And I’ll give you an example in Canada and a cold winter, we’re doing therapy. Uh, my wife goes to therapy with the doctor and, and my son, they come home, we eat dinner. Therapy’s, usually the last thing on our list to do and of course the binders in the car and it’s snowing outside and you get the binder, no I’ll get the binder and it becomes a a bit of a chore. And ultimately, you know, compliance is a big factor in how healthcare technology is really changing our, our medical landscape and knowing that we’re actually doing this homework, knowing that we’re actually logging into the APP as a clinician. I think it’s very powerful.

Dr. Nate: 09:07 So why don’t you tell us a little bit about what you’re doing right now and where, Eye Care and Binovi are headed in the future.

Adam: 09:14 Okay. So as of right now, the binovi platform has been out for about a year. We have doctors in basically four continents around the world that are using the software. And we’ve completed our first video library. We’re extending the content now to add more educational content through some of our doctors. We have developed a tool that’s been around since I think 1974 called the Wayne Saccadic fixator and we’ve released, I think the seventh version of that now as the Binovi touch. So that is a device that is used in the vision therapy clinics with doctors that actually gives you that, uh, in office Rehab, in that office training. That device is now launched to about 100 clinics across the United States, Canada. And, um, and, and we’ve, really we spent two years working in developing this tool. We’ve probably done about 25 different prototypes. We’ve got an early feedback.

Adam: 10:11 We’ve tried to keep it as true to its original version that was loved and used across thousands of locations around the world. Most importantly now it gives the doctors in the therapy teams simplicity of using the IPAD. It gives the children and the patients using this fantastic experience where they can actually engage with modern tools, too complete therapy and obviously most importantly capture patient data profile data. That ties back to these, to these patients so you can measure progress, not just what you’re doing at home, but in the clinic. Now we’re starting to capture that in clinic data, tie it to the patient experience and obviously share with the parents. You know, that progress has happened week after week.

Dr. Nate: 10:55 And that data that you’re collecting from the Binovi touch, which is modeled after one of the most beloved vision therapy instruments of all time. tell us a little bit about some of the other population, some of the other people you’re working with. This is some pretty exciting stuff.

Adam: 11:11 Yeah. You know, this device has been used with professional athletes across the world. Recently we’ve worked with, an individual named Bryce Salvatore who was captain of the New Jersey Devils. He’s using it in, in his New Jersey training facilities with, with kids and trying to promote the importance of what could be done for vision performance. We have championship mma fighters and boxers and soccer players and football players that absolutely love the device and, Rehab hospitals that are using it on stroke patients and a wide range of utilities essentially.

Dr. Nate: 11:49 So, we’re gonna wrap up here because our meeting’s about to start. But anyhow any last few words you want to mention to our listeners,

Adam: 11:56 Just listen. Just go and do that homework. Log into your APP. Hopefully Binovi is giving you a really good experience that multiplies the benefits of what you’re getting from the doctors and therapy teams you’re working with.

Dr. Nate: 12:08 All right, well thank you Adam. we’ve been wanting to do this for for a very long time. We’ve been together at meetings but just didn’t have our schedules line up so I’m thrilled that we were able to do this to everybody who’s listening. Thanks so much. If you ever have questions, you can reach us at office at BrightEyesTampa.com. And, I hope you have a good time and stay dry. Avoid the rain!

Outro: 12:32 Brought to you by Bright Eyes Family Vision Care and Bright Eyes Kids. Find previous episodes and more detailed information at BrightEyesTampa.com Creative Commons, copyright attribution, non-commercial use. The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis country.

 

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

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Read this Important Information About COVID-19 and Bright Eyes!