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Bright Eyes is Getting Bigger!

Hi, it is Dr. Nate with good news!

As longtime patients know, Bright Eyes Family Vision Care was started in a very small location. Located in the West Park Village in the Westchase neighborhood of Tampa, we occupied the space on Montague street where the Coldwell Banker is now. In 2006 we were only open part-time and with less than a thousand square feet. There was one exam room, one vision therapy room, and no separate doctor’s office or designated areas for diagnostic testing or contact lens training.

Brig ht Eyes Family Vision Caregrand Opening photo

Bright Eye Grand Opening in 2006

Our office grew quickly and soon with myself and four employees, we barely had room for patients! So we moved to the Linebaugh Ave location next to Sylvan Learning Center where we are now. With more space, we hired more staff and continued to grow. But we discovered that patients who came to see us from farther away to the north and east, such as Gainesville and Lakeland had a hard time getting through Tampa traffic. So we opened Bright Eyes Kids in New Tampa in 2014. We have continued to grow. We are up to almost 20 employees!

Now it is 2018 and we want to add more eye care staff, but we have no place to put them! Staff members are already coming to blows over seats and computers! OK, not really, but it is crowded. What a problem to have! As it turns out, the Sylvan Learning Center has moved to a different location and since the vacant location is next door to us, we are taking it over. The new combined spaces will be almost three times as large as the current space. We will have more exam rooms, more vision therapy rooms, a larger optical, a conference room, a larger waiting area with a separate kids area, and even more features. It will also mean hiring more excellent staff!

We will begin by remodeling the Sylvan location and then we will update the current Bright Eyes location. Yes, there will be a “Please pardon our dust, while we make improvements to serve you better” sign up. But we WILL remain open during the construction. To be clear – Bright Eyes is not moving, just expanding. The address, phone number, and everything will stay the same. We are VERY excited about this project. It will allow us to make many improvements such as shorter waiting times for appointments and for glasses. The expansion should be complete very early in 2019.

Myself, Cristina, Dr. Beth and the rest of the Bright Eyes Team are so very thankful that our patients trust us with the care of themselves and their family. It means a great deal to us that we can continue to do what we love even better in 2019! If you have questions, suggestions, or recommendations about the expansion, send them to me at Doc@BrightEyesTampa.com or leave them in the comments.

Thank you!

-Dr. Nate

Podcast Episode #5: Eclipse Safety

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

In this episode, Dr. Nate talks about importance of eye protection during the total eclipse.

Full Transcript: (Dr. Nate)

  • From partial-eclipse territory in Tampa, Florida it’s the Bright Eyes Podcast. My name is Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford and I’m excited to talk about this important topic. There’s lots of people that are talking about the upcoming eclipse and I think that that’s great because this is a once in a lifetime opportunity for lots of people. I don’t know if you remember the eclipse that occurred in 1979. I do remember getting together with people and watching it. This is the first total collapse to cut across continental path over the United States since 1918 and lots of people are going to be watching the eclipse. There’s only a small band from Oregon to South Carolina where about 12,000,000 people live that they’re gonna be able to see the total eclipse. I have friends that are traveling to that narrow area so that they can see it in person. But the reason why I’m doing this episode of the podcast is not so much for the astronomical interest but because of the potential for harm that can happen if you are not prepared.
  • Now, last episode Dr. Beth and I talked about types of damage that can occur both short term and long term from ultraviolet light. Well when we’re talking about the eclipse, when we’re talking about actually looking at the sun, this is ultraviolet light damage on steroids! Now you’ve been told (probably your entire life) “do not look directly at the sun” and that’s true at all times, but it’s especially true during an eclipse when the most interesting thing going on is the sun and its relationship to the moon and the earth. Why that’s such a big deal is because there is something called “solar retinopathy” or sometimes called “eclipse blindness”. What happens is, if you look directly at the sun, the focused light of the sun can cause permanent damage to the back of the eye. However, the back of the eye does not have any pain sensors so you won’t feel any pain or see any symptoms right away. What will happen is later on, later that day or the next day you might notice that you’re having trouble seeing. Just as a quick example if you ever look at a strobe light briefly or if you look at a light bulb that doesn’t have a lamp shade on it, you see what’s called an after-image. And it’s just a little image that you see for a little while and it’s different colors and it slowly fades away. That is the where these photoreceptors of the back of the eye are over-stimulated. It takes awhile for them to get down to regular levels. This is it completely different phenomenon. This (solar retinopathy) is where there’s actual damage to the back of the eye. And so while it’s very exciting, and I do encourage everybody to check it out, I do want everybody to do that safely. So I have 4 items that were published by the American Optometric Association and I’m going to read them and then comment on them just a little bit.
  • Number 1: use approved solar eclipse viewers. The only safe way to view a partial solar eclipse is through special purpose solar filters such as eclipse glasses or viewers that meet international standards ISO 12312-2 for safe viewing. Sunglasses, smoked glasses, unfiltered telescope or magnifiers, polarized filters are unsafe. If you can’t find eclipse viewers, build a pinhole projector to watch the eclipse.
  • So a couple different things here. First of all, pinhole projectors are pin hole viewers are pretty cool and you can do that anytime you don’t necessarily have to do that during eclipse time. And so I would encourage anybody to check that out and I’ll put a link in the show notes. But mostly people are going to use a solar eclipse viewers and and what I really want to point out about that is 1) do get them. They’re very inexpensive. We’ve got some the for the staff, because it’s happening during our business hours, and you can get the many different places I will put a link (below). But the most important thing is: I’ve read news articles about how there are fake solar viewers and so you should test yours out to make sure that they’re safe. And the easiest way to test them out is put them on and make sure the only thing that you can see through them is essentially the sun. Anything that’s less bright than the sun, like a computer monitor or a flashlight or a light in the house, you should NOT be able to see through it. If you can, then that’s not safe. The other thing is they do sell filters for telescopes and it’s very important that you not use the viewing glasses or the eclipse glasses to look through the telescope because the telescope has concentrated that light so brightly that that’s not anywhere near a sufficient protection.
  • eclipse picNumber 2: Technique of the pros: Before looking at the sun, cover your eyes with the eclipse viewers.. While standing still, glance at the sun and then turn away and remove your filters. Do not remove your filters while looking at the sun.
  • So this accomplishes 2 purposes. First, of all you can’t wear the solar viewing protection full time because you can’t see anything. (And if anybody remembers the peril sensitive sunglasses from Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, it’s kinda like that – in scary situations). So you can’t just wear these all the time. But what you want to do is you want to position yourself so you’re not walking around, put them on look at the eclipse look away, and then take them off. That ensures that you’re protecting your eyes from the sun and you’re protecting your body from walking around.
  • Number 3: Totally awesome. Only within the path of totality can eclipse viewers safely be removed to view the eclipse. Once the sun begins reappearing, however, viewers must be replaced.
  • And so this is true. But I still want to provide a note of caution. The eclipse is only going to be in totality for 2 minutes and 40 seconds (at longest) so during that time if you’re in the path of the total eclipse. You can take off your viewers you can look at the eclipse, however I don’t encourage you to do that for very long because very quickly the sun’s going to reappear in you’re going to be at risk again. So I would only encourage you to do that for a short amount of time and then replace your viewers as the sun becomes exposed.
  • And finally: Visit your doctor of optometry if you should experience any discomfort or vision problems following the eclipse visit your doctor of optometry for a comprehensive exam.
  • Now, of course we recommend that people get exams regularly anyways but this is one of those special situations. I have a few other links that I’m going to put in about the eclipse that I think are interesting: the map and some information about the solar viewers. I hope everybody enjoys it has a great time. I’m very much looking forward to it. I know my kids are. But I’ve mostly want everybody to stay safe. If you have any questions let us know at office@BrightEyesTampa.com. We’ll see you next time!

Links:

 

Thank you for listening. If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, you can email us at office@brighteyestampa.com.

The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/107937702@N04/

Podcast Episode #4: UV Protection for the Eyes

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

In this episode, Dr. Beth and Dr. Nate go outside to discuss ultraviolet light and the importance of UV protection for the eyes.


Transcript:

Dr. Beth: From Bay Bridge Park in Tampa Bay Florida and this is The Bright Eyes podcast. This is episode number 4. I am Dr. Beth Knighton.

Dr. Nate: And I am Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford.

Dr. Beth: And today’s episode is all about sunlight and UV protection.

Dr. Nate: That is right in so we are at one of our favorite parks near the Bright Eyes Family office as you might be able to tell by the children in the background. DO you come here with your family, Beth?

Dr. Beth: Yeah, all the time. My 2 year old loves this place.

Dr. Nate: The only thing I know about this part is that there’s lots of PokeStops here.

Dr. Beth: It’s great to get out to the park with our family is so there’s lots of benefits of being outside – most of all being active. But it’s also great being with our families, whether it’s biking or camping or whatnot. But the thing that we want to stress today is the importance of UV protection while we are outside. When we’re outside were getting bombarded with all this UV light from the sun and for the same reasons we wear sunscreen on our skin to protect our skin we should be also protecting our eyes

Dr. Nate: So we have a lot of patients that moved here from different parts of the country or even different parts of the world and not everybody knows this. But Florida is the Sunshine State. There’s a lot of sunshine in Florida and while that’s lovely and most people do move here specifically for that reason we also do you have to protect ourselves. One of the first things that you can choose to do is trying not to go outside during the absolute highest amount of UV times that that’s usually from about 10 A. M. to maybe 2 or 3 in the afternoon.

Dr. Beth: It always amuses me when the meteorologists talks about the UV index rather weak because here in Florida it’s basically a 9 everyday the whole summer and our summer is really March to September so it’s always a 9 here … so we are constantly thinking about the UV protection that we need … but not so much unnecessarily. From other parts of the U. S. When we talk about sunglasses it’s important that we’re not only looking at how dark the changes as far as the comfort of how our eyes feel outside but that it actually has UV protection in the lens. You want to look for sunglasses that have UV A and UV B protection and the lenses that helps protect you from the most harmful parts of the sunlight.

Dr. Nate: And not only do you want sunglasses that have both right section but ideally you want sunglasses like the ones that we have on right now that have a little curvature to them so they limit light coming in from the sides that it not only protects your eyes eyeball itself but also the eyelids and so that they should look good they should feel good but most importantly they should provide lots of coverage. And you can supplement that with a hat or a visor to protect from the directs sun overhead as much as possible. So Beth is the sunlight a short term, a long term issue, or can it be both?

podcast

Dr. Nate and Dr. Beth protecting their eyes from UV light

Dr. Beth: Absolutely both so there are short term effects on the eyes so say you’re going out on the boat with their family and you’re gonna go water skiing so you’re not wearing your sunglasses you can actually get the equivalent of a sunburn on the front surface of your eye from all the exposure to the light … throughout the day so that’s a short term kind of consequence of the sunlight but then also we have the long term buildup of all this UV damage over time which is exactly why all of our dermatologists in primary care doctors tell us to wear sunscreen and make up with sunscreen and lotions with sunscreen on a daily basis to protect our skin and certainly sunglasses help to prevent those same kind of skin cancers from the eyelids and the surface are round eyes. But also we want to protect the inside parts of our eyes from that long term build up of UV damage the things that that long term UV damage can cause include cataracts or macular degeneration which both can have a impact on how well you can see we want you to be able to see along into your nineties and perhaps beyond and so wearing sunglasses even as a child or young adult really is setting the groundwork for keeping that vision healthy throughout your life.

Dr. Nate: And if you wanted one more reason to protect your eyes from ultraviolet light, it might not cause pain or it might not because I disease but Dr. Knighton and I every day when we look under the microscope people’s eyes we can see the sun damage that occurs on the white parts of people’s eyes called the sclera. People often ask us where can I do to get rid of that and the best answer is to prevent that change from happening in the first place and the way you do that is to protect your eyes with sunglasses, with hats, with using caution when you’re outside when it’s very, very bright.

Dr. Beth: Another really cool advancement and I care is that a lot of the contact lenses also include some UV protection being built right into the contact lens and so that’s been really fantastic that companies have been integrating into the contacts in order to promote healthy vision.

Dr. Beth: One thing that I get asked a lot is what’s the difference between UV protection on my sunglasses and polarization and my sunglasses. The UV protection is that healthy part. That’s the part that blocks out the harms full rays of light to keep your eyes healthy. The polarization is a filter in the sunglasses that helps. to sharpen the vision to kind of give you that HD vision but polarization on its own does not protect you from the harmful light rays so ideally you have sunglasses that have both. But certainly the UV protection is the important part.

Dr. Nate: That is right and that is what we tell patients all day everyday.

Dr. Beth: Well, thank you for listening if you have any questions comments or suggestions you can email us at office@brighteyestampa.com. Until next time…..

Links:

Thank you for listening. If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, you can email us at office@brighteyestampa.com.

The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro/outro music: Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Podcast Episode #2: What is an Optometrist? (The 5 O’s)

Welcome to The Bright Eyes Podcast: Advice for Healthy Vision for All Ages. Your hosts are Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford & Dr. Beth Knighton, residency-trained optometrist that provide eye exams for glasses and contacts, and specialty services including vision therapy, myopia control, orthokeratology, and sports vision training. Their mission to empower patients by providing the best in friendly, professional, and individualized eye care.

For episode #2 of the Bright Eyes Podcast, Dr. Nate and Dr. Beth discuss the differences and similarities between the 5 O’s:

  • Optometrists
  • Ophthalmologists
  • Opticians
  • Orthoptists
  • Ocularists


Transcript:

Dr. Beth: [00:00:03] From rainy Tampa Bay it’s the Bright Eyes podcast. This is episode number two. I’m Dr. Beth Knighton.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:10] And I am Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford.

Dr. Beth: [00:00:13] And today’s episode is all about what is an optometrist.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:18] That’s right. But first Beth I need to acknowledge the elephant in the room and that is it really does not sound like we’re recording this in a professional recording studio in New York with hundreds of thousands of dollars of equipment. You know why that is?

Dr. Beth: [00:00:36] Because we’re in our office on the laptop.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:41] It’s true we’ve got our Blue Yeti microphone and our laptop in the blue exam room in Bright Eyes Family Vision Care and it doesn’t sound perfect but it sounds OK. And hopefully over time as we do more of these we will make it sound a little bit better. I was too impatient to get started with the podcast. So here we are.

staffDr. Beth: [00:01:13] So I get asked a lot about what the difference is between an optometrist and an ophthalmologist. And the main difference between the two is surgical treatment. So optometrists and ophthalmologists are trained in eye disease and how the eye works. But we take it from slightly different perspectives, so an optometrist will look more at the functional aspects of eyes and vision how they work as a team versus a ophthalmologist who will look at it from an eye disease standpoint deciding if surgery or laser treatment or other options are needed. And so we both are critical to the eye care world without one or the other. It would really be difficult for our patients. And so the better that we can work as a team and be on board together for our patients it provides better outcomes for everybody.

Dr. Nate: [00:02:24] Yeah I agree with that. I think that as a general rule optometrists tend to think more about vision and vision development as people grow from being infants to toddlers to kids to teenagers to adults how their vision changes and what their visual needs are. I think the ophthalmologists that I know some of my friends who are ophthalmologists they tend to think more about how the eyes grow and how the eyes age and what kind of diseases the eyeballs themselves can get. And that would include everything from cataracts and glaucoma and diseases related to diabetes. And any of those things. And like Dr. Beth said both are extremely important but they do have slightly different perspectives.

Dr. Beth: [00:03:24] The training for the two is similar but different. And that optometrists and ophthalmologists go for their undergraduate degree, four years of that then optometrists go on to optometry school for four years. And of the optometrists who graduate some of them choose to go on for residency for further training. Like Dr. Nate and I did in pediatrics specifically, but there are lots of specialties that optometrists can go into. And ophthalmologist when they leave under-graduate go on to four years of medical school where they learn eyes and body and then go on to do a three to five year residency in ophthalmology or their specialty and potentially onto fellowship after that for further training. So that’s the difference between an optometrist and an ophthalmologist. But then there’s also an optician. And so Nate you want to tell us a little bit about that.

Dr. Nate: [00:04:29] So before I went to optometry school my wife Cristina was getting her masters at the University of Wisconsin – Madison I was an optician. An optician is somebody who is specially trained in the fitting and fabrication and fixing and dispensing of glasses. And in some states those are licensed in Florida you can get an optician license but you don’t have to have one. In some states they’re not licensed. So I had the experience of being an optician and working with glasses and one of my favorite things about being an optician was repairing glasses when they appeared to be hopelessly damaged. Sometimes you have to be very creative to fix glasses so that people can use them until they’re able to purchase a new pair.

Dr. Beth: [00:05:33] We’ve seen some come into the office that have been pretty mangled at that time. It’s true. So what about orthoptists? Some people have heard of that. How does that fit in?

Dr. Nate: [00:05:46] So an orthoptist is a form of vision therapist that works with ophthalmologists. I’ve known a few orthoptists. Unfortunately they are kind of a vanishing breed. They used to be much more common when ophthalmologists provided more visual training or vision therapy to help improve the functional vision of patients. They don’t tend to do that as much. And so they don’t have the orthtopists to help them develop the skills for patients but they are very dedicated and knowledgeable people they know a whole lot about the eyes and how they move and focus and coordinate vision.

Dr. Nate: [00:06:37] And then there’s one more and that is an ocularist. And an ocularist makes prosthetic eyes. Or sometimes people call them up Glass-Eye even though they’re not glass but they are fake. I have somebody either didn’t develop an eye properly or they lost it due to trauma or some sort of injury. Yes they are extremely talented artists that make prosthetic that’s comfortable for patients and it’s hand-painted to match the other eye as closely as possible. I always think that that’s fascinating work.

Dr. Nate: [00:07:19] There are some really great videos and some of these topics. There is a wonderful video that says “I am a Doctor of Optometry” (below) and we’ll put that in the show notes. There’s another video about what an optometrist is and there’s some ones about opticians and ocularists. So all of those.

Dr. Beth: [00:07:43] Thank you all for listening. If you have any questions comments or suggestions you can e-mail us at office@BrightEyesTampa.com. Until next time stay dry.

Thank you for listening. If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, you can email us at office@brighteyestampa.com.

The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro/outro music by Lucas Warford of Three For Silver.

Podcast Episode #1 – Who We Are

Note: This is the first episode of our new podcast that will cover all aspects of vision care. You can listen in the player below or read the transcript. The show is available via Stitcher, Google Play, iTunes, and the webplayer below. You can find all episodes here. If you have any suggestions for future episodes, please email office@BrightEyesTampa.com.

-Dr. Nate

Episode 1 transcript:

Dr. Nate: [00:00:00] From sunny Tampa Bay is the Bright Eyes podcast. This is episode number one. I’m Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford.

Dr. Beth: [00:00:09] And I am Dr. Beth Knighton.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:11] And today’s episode is all about us. In the future, we’re going to talk about different aspects of eyes and vision care and different things that you can do to take care of your eyes and improve your vision. But for today since this is our very first podcast episode we’re going to introduce you a little bit about us our practice and how we do things. So how are you feeling, Beth?

Dr. Beth: [00:00:39] I’m feeling great.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:41] Are you excited?Warford 2597 color 239x300

Dr. Beth: [00:00:42] Yes.

Dr. Nate: [00:00:42] Are you excited to be doing podcasts?

Dr. Beth: [00:00:44] Yeah. 🙂

Dr. Nate: [00:00:46] So first off, I have lots of experience in podcasting. My first podcast was in 2010 to 2013. I also do another podcast with an ophthalmologist which we do every month and I think it is a wonderful medium to share information. I’m an avid podcast listener. I listen to podcasts literally every day. So I think it’s fantastic and I’m excited to do it. What about your experience?

Dr. Beth: [00:01:19] Yes I am excited to do this new adventure here learning about podcasts and getting our information out there to everybody.

Dr. Nate: [00:01:29] Great. So a little bit about me. I grew up in north central Florida and I went to University of Florida. I got my Optometry degree at the Illinois College of Optometry in Chicago. I did my residency in Pediatric Vision and Vision Therapy also at ICO and then we moved back to Florida and we opened Bright Eyes Family Vision Care here in Westchase in 2006. We’ve been working here for the last 11 years. I say we because my wife Cristina is the office manager and we’ve grown from a tiny office with just a handful of staff to two offices with about 16 staff members.Dr EK Pic 224x300

Dr. Beth: [00:02:16] I grew up in Clearwater, Florida. I went to the University of South Florida in Tampa for my undergraduate degree and then I also went to the Illinois College of Optometry in Chicago like Dr. Nate and went on to do my Pediatric Residency at the University of Houston in Texas and I stayed on there teaching for a little while. But Florida is my home and I was able to come back this way. So now back in the Tampa Bay area I reached out to Dr. Nate. And at that time he was looking to expand to create the second office which is Bright Eyes Kids and so I was able to join the Bright Eyes family in 2014 and started out part time and grew as the practice did. And now here at the Bright Eyes Westchase office and the Bright Eyes Kids office full time with Dr. Nate

Dr. Nate: [00:03:17] Yes. And it is fantastic. I love having a doctor that I can work with and ask questions to and we can talk about cases and different experiences even though we both went to the same optometry school we did different residencies and so we have different experiences and that helps us serve our patients better.

Dr. Beth: [00:03:44] And it’s really great – it is a lot of fun.

Dr. Nate: [00:03:48] Dr. Beth spends a little bit more time at the family practice. I spend a little bit more time at the kids office and that’s primarily just because she lives closer to the Westchase office and I live closer to the New Tampa office because we’re both plenty capable of doing both but we have a lot of fun.

Dr. Beth: [00:04:09] We really like our job and working with patients of all ages. It’s surprising to people when they find out that we routinely see patients that are six months old. Sometimes a little younger. It’s something that we really enjoy.

Dr. Nate: [00:04:28] What do you do when you’re not working with patients.

Dr. Beth: [00:04:33] I love spending time with my family and I especially love spending time out on my small sailboat. I love being outside doing pretty much anything whether it’s camping or biking. We always love being outside and Florida is a great place to be doing all those things as opposed to our cold winters that we had in Chicago.

Dr. Nate: [00:05:01] It was cold. It’s true. I also like doing things outside. I like to run and go camping. We have a lot of people in my family who play music and so we make music and I like to read and spend time with my family. And sometimes when we have time we like to travel and I’d say that’s mostly what we do.

Dr. Nate: [00:05:31] So we’re going to cover many topics about eyes and vision glasses contacts and vision therapy and Ortho-K. What other topics are we going to cover?

Dr. Beth: [00:05:45] We’re going to cover brain injuries and how that affects the eyes. We will cover why sunglasses are important for your vision and even topics about certain eye diseases you may have heard of like cataracts and macular degeneration.

Dr. Nate: [00:06:02] Yes. So thank you for listening to our very first episode ever. If you have any questions comments or suggestions you can e-mail us at office@BrightEyesTampa.com. Until next time. Have fun and be safe.

If you have questions about your or your children’s eyes or vision please call us at 813-792-0637 or use the button below to request an appointment.
Schedule An Appointment

Brought to you by Bright Eyes Family Vision Care and Bright Eyes Kids. Find previous episodes and more detailed information at BrightEyesTampa.com. Creative Commons Copyright attribution, non-commercial use.

The only purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is no substitute for professional care by a doctor experienced in the area you require. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. Please consult your physician for diagnosis and treatment.

Intro and outro music by Lucas Warford.

Dr. Beth and Dr. Nate lecture in Miami

This weekend, Dr. Nate, Dr. Beth and vision therapists took a trip to Miami Beach to attend the 6th Annual Florida COVD Study Group. Dr. Nate is one of the founding members of the group and usually goes each summer to listen, lecture, and discuss the very latest treatments for patients.

The talks were very good. Bob Orsillo, OD spoke about about sports vision enhancement. Dr. John Kuluz from Miami Children’s Neurology Dept spoke about sports-related concussion. Dr. Matthew Kay, South Florida’s leading neuro-ophthalmologist, spoke about double vision.

Dr. Beth and Dr. Nate gave a 2 hour Prezi called “Amblyopia and Strabismus Therapy Treatment with Virtual Reality“. It was an interactive discussion of our use of Vivid Vision, the Oculus Rift-based VR vision therapy tool. It was created to bring immersive new technology to long-standing principles of vision therapy. You can read more about Vivid Vision here.

After hours there was swimming, food and drinks, and more discussion about vision therapy. 🙂

The meeting was sponsored by Eyecarrot. They the company behind, Binovi, the new vision therapy tracking technology that we are using at Bright Eyes.

Here are a few pictures from the meeting:

01 Vivid Vision in action02

2017 Spring Newsletter:New Hours, Sales, Giveaway, Ortho-K, VR & more!

 

Hello, Bright Eyes Patients! Welcome to our first email update of 2017. We have so much to tell you that we’ll get right to it:

Not One But Two Spring Events

Spring EventsSpring has sprung and we have 2 big events coming up! The first is our Spring Eyewear Show on Wednesday, April 26 from 4 to 8pm. This is a trunk show of all the Banana Republic and Smith Optics eyeglasses, including sunglasses. Win a FREE pair of prescription sunglasses from Smith! The second is the Spring Cleaning Sale Monday April 24 through Friday, April 28. The doctors are away at a conference most of the week, but both offices will be open – all eyeglasses and sunglasses on sale! Read more here.

Hours Reminder

Our Westchase office has new hours: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday 9am-5pm. Wednesday is still 12-8pm, Friday 8:30am-4:30pm and Saturday 9am-2pm. See all the details here.

Big News about Ortho-K!

We have been getting more requests than ever about Ortho-K, the overnight contact lenses that allows for clear, glasses-free vision. You might have seen Dr. Nate on the news! You can read about Dr. Nate’s daughter’s own experience with Orthok-K and also read more about the process here. Treehouse Eyes is an office in Washington DC that specializes in myopia control, and they did a story on Dr. Nate’s daughter.

VR Home Therapy is Live

We are one of the first eye doctors to offer Vivid Vision Virtual Reality Vision Therapytreatment for amblyopia and strabismus, but we are now able to offer this treatment as part of a home Vision Therapy program. This is a game-changer for patients both children and adults. If you are interested, call us at 813-792-0637.

Updated Website

You may have noticed that we’ve been hard at work on our website BrightEyesTampa.com, especially pages on Myopia Control, Ortho-k, Vivid Vision and others. Check it out!

Other topics of interest from our blog

We’ve covered some important topics such as Top 10 For Screentime, Women’s Eye Health & Safety Month, Cleaning Your Glasses, The Importance Blue Light, & Eye Color.

Reviews

Finally, we want to say that we are very thankful for all the Yelp and Google reviews. Most people find us through online reviews or word-of-mouth, and as a small business, we appreciate it! If you haven’t left a review, it would mean a lot if you did.

Thanks and have a great spring! 🙂

-Dr. Nate

Bright Eyes Family and Bright Eyes Kids

A custom uploaded image.

2 Events: Smith Optics Show/Banana Republic Show and Spring Cleaning Eyewear Sale!

 

Event 1: Spring Eyewear Show!

Wednesday, April 26 – 4 to 8pm

25% OFF 1st pair – 50% Off 2nd Pair

Bright Eyes Family Vision Care – Westchase

Win FREE SMITH PRESCRIPTION SUNGLASSES!

Featuring Smith Optics and Banana Republic.

Every style, every color, every size to try on Eyeglasses! Sunglasses! Women! Men!

 

Spring2

Event 2: Spring Cleaning Sale

Mon, April 24 – Fri, April 28

One week! Two offices!

Every frame on SALE! $50 – $100 OFF!

 

Spring Events

My Daughter’s Ortho-K Journey

I wear glasses. Most people in my family wear glasses or contacts because they cannot see well at a distance. They have myopia, also known as nearsightedness. This story is similar for my wife, Cristina who is also the office manager at Bright Eyes. She and many members of her family are myopic. So it was not surprising that our older child, Nora, has also become nearsighted. She has now started orthokeratology to help keep her from become even more nearsighted. Read on to find out more about her Ortho-K journey.

Nora's First Eye Exam

Nora’s First Exam

Nora is not alone. All over the world, people are becoming more myopic and kids are needing glasses at earlier ages. At Nora’s regular eye exams (see recommendations here), I have been checking her vision carefully. Two years ago it was obvious that she was going to be become nearsighted. We had been implementing several steps to delay her impending myopia.

Finally, the summer before 4th grade during a game of “eye spy” it was evident that she was having trouble seeing clearly far away. An eye exam was scheduled and a prescription for -1.00 D glasses was written. She picked out some lovely and fun glasses before school started. She also had soft daily disposable contacts for occasional use.

Nora before Ortho-K

Nora Before Orthok

By Spring Break, Nora was squinting again even with her glasses. Indeed, her exam showed that her prescription had increased. We were ready to employ some methods to reduce the rate at which her vision was getting worse. This is called myopia control and the basic options are Ortho-k, soft multifocal contacts, and atropine eyedrops. So Cristina and I decided that it was time for Nora to do Ortho-K. We knew this time would come, it was just a matter of when it was convenient to start. We decided Spring Break was the perfect time.

The first step was to get Nora on board. After all, she liked her glasses and was not excited at first about giving them up. Cristina and I talked with her about freedom from glasses for sports and swimming. We also showed her some of these videos from YouTube. She was ready!

Nora came to Bright Eyes Kids for her Ortho-K exam. This includes more vision testing and special testing of the front part of her eyes called corneal topography. This special test allowed me to design custom NightLens Ortho-K lenses for her. They were produced in a specialized contact lens lab and sent to the office.

Nora was very excited when her Ortho-K lenses came in. At this point she was taught how to put them in and take them out safely as well as everything she needed to know about caring for her lenses. That night, she put the contacts in and went to sleep. It was surprisingly easy. The next day she came to Bright Eyes Kids for her 1-day evaluation and she was seeing 20/20! Her vision has been great ever since. She was able to do everything on her Spring Break trip including kayaking, Everglades Airboat rides, and the Trampoline park all without her glasses.

Nora After Orthok

Nora After Orthok

If you think that your child is a candidate for Ortho-K and want to find out more call us at (813)792-0637 or request an appointment.

By the way, Nora’s brother is two years younger than her and he is not nearsighted yet, but we are trying to prevent it with atropine eye drops. You can learn more about that here.

-Dr. Nate

PS – If you are an eye doctor who has employed any myopia control strategies with your kids, I’d love to talk to you about it. Email me at Doc@BrightEyesTampa.com.

 

TV News Segment on Orthokeratology and Myopia Control

The mission of Bright Eyes Family Vision Care and Bright Eyes Kids is to empower our patients by providing the best vision care possible. One of the most exciting ways that we are able to do this now is called orthokeratology. It is one of the methods used to keep children from getting more and more nearsighted. Like vision therapy, it is complicated, but very, very rewarding.

I am very happy that word of orthok and myopia control is spreading! You can see for yourself from this excellent recent news segment from 10News CBS WTSP did featuring me and a patient of Bright Eyes.

Here it is:

A HUGE THANKS to reporter Courtney Robinson She was great to work with and genuinely interested in children’s vision and the effect of screen time. She took the time to come to the office and ask many fantastic questions. You can read her whole story here.

 

I am also thrilled that my daughter, Nora, has started orthok. I will write a blog post about that next. 🙂

If you have any questions, please let us know. Use the button below or call us at (813) 792-0637. And as a reminder, orthok is not just for kids. We do have adult patients that use orthok to be free from glasses for sports or while reading their phones or other activities.

See Well!

-Dr. Nate

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